Content with Topics : Engaged Curriculum

To Witness with White Eyes: A Review of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me.

By Andrew J. Pierce, Ph.D., Sacred Heart University Who is the intended audience of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ provocative, haunting, and darkly beautiful reflections on race in Between the World and Me? In one sense, the answer is obvious. The book is written in the form of a letter to Coates’ son, a child of 15, roughly the same age as the ever-increasing number of black children whose blood is spilt daily across the back alleys of American cities and, increasingly, across the front pages of American newspapers. In another sense, the answer is more complex. On the one hand, the book…

Global Service-Learning Workshop at Sacred Heart University, with Connecticut Campus Compact

By Eric Hartman  Many thanks to Sacred Heart University and Connecticut Campus Compact for supporting a recent global service-learning faculty and staff development workshop. We focused on: Fundamentals of global service-learning Employing reflection models across immersive service-learning experiences to deepen students’ intercultural learning Ethical global partnerships through fair trade learning See here for overarching GSL presentation on points above, as well as further explanation in respect to employing the culture pie exercise in conjunction with a This American Life episode Most existing fair trade learning resources are compiled here  Cultivation of global citizenship and participation in global civil society See here…

Learning Where the Shoe Pinches Most: How an eight-year relationship between GESI and a community partner in Uganda has come to bear fruit

By Laura Hayes, Northwestern University When the Global Engagement Studies Institute  (GESI) launched in 2007, the city of Jinja, Uganda was chosen as the first location for Northwestern students to do international development work. Since then, the GESI study abroad program has exploded in size and popularity. Today, GESI is Northwestern’s largest single study abroad program, and close to 400 students have completed over 100 international development projects in eight (soon to be nine) different countries. Next fall, GESI will expand its global service learning academic program to the fall quarter. The GESI program places students with international partner organizations such…

Coalition of Universities, NGOs Seeks PT Volunteer Fellow to Advance Ethical Global Learning, Engagement at High School Level

In cooperation with the Better Volunteering, Better Care Network and the GASP Working Group, globalsl.org – a coalition of universities and NGOs advancing ethical global learning and partnerships – seeks a part-time volunteer fellow to map existing ethical global engagement and learning strategies at the high school level in the United States, and develop a strategy for expanding understanding in this area. This is neither a general effort to encourage study abroad nor a specific effort to support particular programs abroad. Rather, it is an inquiry into the best methods to discourage programming that is harmful to vulnerable populations (e.g. childrenor patients) and develop young peoples’ capacities to make…

Exploring Manifestations of Decolonial Education in North to South Study Abroad

By Emma Wright I have been both a student and a practitioner within the fields of international education and Study Abroad in Ecuador and I am the first to admit that I have not always felt comfortable with the type of programming that tends to dominate. As a student, the experience profoundly affected my perceptions of power, privilege, and inequality in a world shaped by imperial and colonial legacies. But I also felt and still feel that such critical reflection is often not the norm within North-South (N-S) Study Abroad programs. Furthermore, I still ask myself whether I took advantage…

Webinar: Stay Home? And Generation Abroad – Practitioner Wisdom

Eighty practitioners, researchers, and otherwise thoughtful folks gathered recently for globalsl.org’s first webinar.  During the discussion several frameworks for ethical global engagement were mentioned. Those resources are listed below. Many thanks to those individuals who joined the conversation, as well as to our presenters. Survey feedback indicates strong interest in continuing this series. We will do that with our second webinar on October 16, at noon EST (details below). The webinar recording that follows is one hour and includes several pearls of insight, including some thinking on what will really cause universities to support ethical global engagement. After the first thirty seconds,…

Global/Local: Much Discussed, Little Understood, and the Right Thing To Do

By Virginia Rowthorn, JD I am the co-director of an interprofessional global health education center on a graduate school campus that is comprised of schools of medicine, nursing, law, pharmacy, nursing, social work, and dentistry.  Our center – through grant programs and logistical services – supports global health experiential learning and research projects.  A colleague and I were sitting at a global health conference 18 months ago and musing about the different sessions when one of us casually commented, “there’s a lot of talk about global/local this year.”  In fact the words global/local, glo/lo, and the questionable shortcut glocal were suddenly everywhere.  As a lawyer who works…

New Film: The Voluntourist

We may have the current generation’s To Hell with Good Intentions in a recent film from UK-based Chloé Sanguinetti, The Voluntourist. Sanguinetti captures well the moral hazards, imperialist assumptions, and naivete that collude to produce imperfect outcomes for volunteers and – all to often – negative outcomes for communities. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=1650&v=E16iOaAP4SQ While it seems that ninety or ninety-five percent of the film exposes negative outcomes  associated with uninformed international volunteering, Sanguinetti’s closing narration offers the possibility for good programming. She asserts there are “right ways to volunteer, good programs, and good organizations,” while acknowledging that “it is easy to become a victim in this market.” Finally, and…

New Focus on the Community Engagement Professional

The number of administrative staff who support community engagement within higher education has grown exponentially over the past 10-12 years. Looking at the 2014 Campus Compact survey, 100% of respondents report having dedicated engagement staff. Looking at a survey of Carnegie Classified institutions, 91% of respondents reported having full-time administrative staffing for their engagement centers (Welch & Saltmarsh, 2013). Despite their growing numbers, there has been very little empirical literature focused on these administrative stakeholders, such as myself. As a group, we influence the ways faculty, students, community partners, and institutional leaders implement and evolve engagement within higher education. We…

Stay Home? And Generation Abroad – Practitioner Wisdom, Sept 2 WEBINAR

In response to numerous calls to open an online, discursive space for conversations on ethical global engagement, globalsl is kicking off a webinar series this fall. Please register now, here or below, to be part of the conversation. You will receive sign-in information on Tuesday, September 1, in preparation for the Wednesday, September 2 webinar. Going to the Action: Stay Home? And Generation Abroad – Practitioner Wisdom Wednesday, September 2, 1 pm EST Global nongovernmental organizations dedicated to advancing development partnerships through cooperation with students and volunteers will speak to their mission-driven rationales for involving young people in these efforts….

WATCH: New 3-Minute Video Summarizes Research Insights on Good, Bad Community Impacts of International Volunteering, Voluntouring

In the back-and-forth argument on voluntourism, ethical global service, poverty porn, and volunteering for development, have you ever wondered if there’s a real evidence base? There is. Please watch and share this brief summary of accumulated insights. Links to the relevant research appear in the video transcript below. The transcript is followed by recent, diverse resources that support mutually beneficial and empowering global service and learning. https://vimeo.com/133662301 International Volunteering from Kindea Labs on Vimeo. Transcript  Even as universities and schools expand global learning and community engagement, there is a raging debate about international volunteer service. Some people say that volunteering and service-learning…

Global Education: Insights from Pine Ridge, South Dakota

Stylus has released a truly exciting new volume, Putting the Local in Global Education: Models for Transformative Learning Through Domestic Off-Campus Programs. Here’s what Azusa Pacific’s Richard Slimbach has to say about it, “For over 100 years, we have used geographically marked terms—like distant lands,overseas study, education abroad, and international education—to mark a global education. The learning models assembled in this volume help us to see that the ‘global’ is no longer somewhere ‘out there’; it is right here, at our doorstep, touching all of our lives, and inviting a new generation of ‘rooted cosmopolitans’ to help create the kind of world…

Philosophy & the 4th of July: Helping One Another Become Fully Human

The Public Radio show On Being featured an hour-long conversation with Philosophy Professor Jacob Needleman, The Inward Work of American Democracy in June of 2012. The broadcast is more relevant than ever. Needleman investigated the relationship between the United States Founders’ spirituality, their commitment to the idea of democracy, and their sense of virtue and responsibility. He believes “the great purpose of America is to provide a place in which people can become fully human.” It is an extraordinary and unique reflection on several American thinkers and their relationship to purpose, belief, and The Republic. He considers writings and history spanning…

Powerful Art from a Powerful Week

We thank the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Mike Luckovich for creating the provocative cartoon above, and are equally indebted to the spoken word artists Darius Simpson and Scout Bostley for the profound performance below: https://youtu.be/lpPASWlnZIA We hope these pieces will support your classroom and living-room efforts to spark high-quality dialogue on race in America. As our friends at Imagining America remind us, art can help us advance conversations where hearts meet minds in civic life. Editor’s Note: As frequently mentioned here, global learning does not require crossing a national border. Indeed, engaging thoughtfully across cultures is sometimes even more challenging at home, where…

Frederick Douglass' July 4th Oration, "the Constitution is a GLORIOUS LIBERTY DOCUMENT."

The 4th of July will soon be upon us in and around Baltimore, Charleston, and Ferguson – and all across the United States. Hopefully, community members will take time to reflect with family and friends on the distances between our everyday actions and our highest ideals. In that vein, we take seriously the requirement that all service and community engagement should be historically contextualized. As we think back on the events of the previous year, understanding American ideals through the words and example of 19th Century American social reformer and abolitionist Frederick Douglass seems as important as ever. ORATION, DELIVERED IN…

Evaluating public and community health programs

This book presents a participatory model for the evaluation of community health programs and policy interventions. It is a guide for public health and community health students, practitioners, and faculty to develop community-validated evaluation programs. Discussed are two evaluation frameworks that are most commonly used in public and community heath: the Donaldson three-step program theory-driven evaluation approach and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s six-step Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health. Methods in community assessment, planning, program design, quantitative and qualitative data collection, data analysis, and dissemination of findings are outlined as a step-by-step process to program evaluation….

Designing community-based courses: A guide for instructors to develop community partnerships and create public scholarship courses

This handbook is a guide for faculty, lecturers, graduate students, and staff to create, implement, or strengthen engaged scholarship courses. The handbook contains six sections: Engaged Public Scholarship, Building Campus-Community Partnerships, Developing Engaged Scholarship Courses, Supporting Student Engagement with the Community, Deepening the Learning with Reflection, Developing Evaluation and Assessment for Engaged Scholarship. Avila-Lynn, C., Rice K., & Akin, S. (2012). Designing community-based courses: A guide for instructors to develop community partnerships and create public scholarship courses. Cal Corps Public Service Center, University of California Berkeley. 3-45. Full Text.

Civic Engagement, Social Responsibility: Charleston, Baltimore, Ferguson – What should your campus do?

We don’t want soft thinking. We don’t want paternalistic forms of service. We want deep, rigorous, historically grounded reflection coupled with community-driven learning, cooperative development, and movement toward solidarity. Hartman & Kiely’s (2014) definition of global service-learning emphasizes the importance of understanding structures and power relations: Global service learning is a community-driven service experience that employs structured, critically reflective practice to better understand common human dignity; self; culture; positionality; socio-economic, political, and environmental issues; power relations; and social responsibility, all in global contexts (p. 60). An important component of structural thinking is historical thinking. When, through community-driven articulations of applied service…

South Carolina Poet Laureate Finds the Words for the Moment

When we’re told we’ll never understand Someone says a drug-related incident, someone says he was quiet, he mostly kept to himself, someone says mental illness, someone says a hateful and deranged mind, someone says he was a loner, he wasn’t bullied, someone says his sister was getting married in four days, a newsman says an attack on faith, a relative says his mother never raised him to be like this, a friend says he had that kind of Southern pride, strong conservative beliefs, someone says he made a lot of racist jokes, but you don’t really take them seriously like…

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard to Talk to White People About Racism

Editor’s Note: As frequently mentioned here, global learning does not require crossing a national border. Indeed, engaging thoughtfully across cultures is sometimes even more challenging at home, where biases and assumptions are entrenched over lifetimes and generations. The 2014-15 academic year began with Ferguson and ended with Baltimore; now we have Charleston. At globalsl, we find it more important than ever to include a focus on domestic cross-cultural cooperation, learning, and community-driven development. With the permission of the Editor at The Good Men Project, where this content first appeared, we begin with a post that may support educators’ and community…