Content with Topics : Engaged Campus

Teacher action research: Building democracies

Written as a textbook for graduate level courses in action research, this book considers action research as a vehicle to develop knowledge democracies. It explores why action research is practiced, discusses the historical origin of the practice and relation to other theoretical perspectives, and offers research methods and case studies illustrating how action research contributes to democratic inquiry within institutions. Pine, G. (2009). Teacher action research: Building democracies. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1-396.

Community-based participatory research: A strategy for building health communities and promoting health through policy change

This 60 page report to The California Endowment offers an overview of community based participatory research (CBPR) – its definition and principles – and discussion of this research practice as a policy change tool.  Eight “promising CBPR practices” are highlighted along with six case studies of CBPR utilized to effect policy change in California.  The monograph concludes with a chapter on evaluating CBPR processes and outcomes and comprehensive lists of helpful websites and other CBPR resources. Minkler, M., Garcia, A.P., Rubin, V. & Wallerstein, N. (2012).  Community-based participatory research: A strategy for building healthy communities and promoting health through policy…

Reconceptualizing engagement: a conceptual framework for analyzing university interaction with external social partners

This article contributes to the theoretical debate around the definition of “community engagement” in South Africa. It presents a conceptual framework that was developed to measure and map existing engaged academic activities. The article explains how the framework was developed, and how it can be used to guide empirical research, institutional strategic planning, and national higher education policy processes. Kruss, G. (2012). Reconceptualizing engagement: a conceptual framework for analyzing university interaction with external social partners. South African Review of Sociology, 43(2), 5-26. Full Text.

The Utility of educational action research for emancipatory change

Although the potential of action research (AR) to advance social justice and emancipatory change has become a popular and accepted concept, educational AR has fallen short of achieving these aims. This article focuses on how educational AR has been used as a method for teaching, increasing professional efficacy, implementing policy, and how each method of educational AR has its own emancipatory potential and challenges. Kinsler, K. (2010). The utility of educational action research for emancipatory change. Action Research, 8(2), 171-189. Full Text.

Community Engagement: Terms and Definitions for Promotion and Tenure Guidelines

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro developed this document to inform the re-examination of community engagement policies and practices. The document provides definitions of community-engaged scholarship, community-engaged research/creative activity, community-engaged teaching, and distinguishes these topics from “community service” or “outreach”. Janke, E.M., & Shelton, T.L. (2011). Community Engagement: Terms and Definitions for Promotion and Tenure Guidelines. Community Engagement Initiative, University of North Carolina Greensboro. 1-10. Full Text.

Community-based Participatory Research from the Margin to the Mainstream: Are Researchers Prepared?

Developing sustainable and scalable strategies to prevent and control cardiovascular diseases is a challenging but necessary undertaking. This article asserts the ways in which CBPR is the appropriate approach to developing these strategies, providing background on CBPR in the following topics: definition, purpose, benefits, effectiveness, implementation, partnerships, study design, funding and ethics review, dissemination of findings, and translation of research to practice/policy. Horowitz, C.R., Robinson, M., & Seifer, S. (2009). Community-Based Participatory Research From the Margin to the Mainstream: Are Researchers Prepared? Circulation, 119, 2633-2642. Full Text.

Learning about scholarship in action in concept and practice

In an address to the campus at the end of her inaugural year (April, 2005), Chancellor Nancy Cantor announced her vision of Syracuse University as a Creative Campus whose faculty and students would be deeply engaged with the world, interacting with local and global communities in productive relationships and activities that she named “scholarship in action.” Recognizing the difficulty of fitting such public or community-engaged scholarship into the traditional framework for defining and evaluating faculty work, she called on the Academic Affairs Committee of the Senate to study the issues related to implementing this vision. This is a study of…

Sustaining CBPR partnerships to address health disparities in times of economic instability

This report addresses the reality that CBPR partnerships in underserved communities face unanticipated challenges because of unstable economic environments. It describes challenges experienced by HealthLink, a CBPR partnership to address cancer disparities in Queens, N.Y. and how Health Link adapted. Recommendations for designing CBPR partnerships to overcome unexpected challenges are provided. Weiss, E. S., Stevenson, A. J., Erb-Downward, J., & Combs, S., Sabino, E., Michel, T. … Rapkin, B. (2012). Sustaining CBPR partnerships to address health disparities in times of economic instability. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 23(4), 1527-1535. Full Text.

Evaluation of community-academic partnership functioning

Community-university partnerships should be assessed by process evaluations to confirm that the principles of CBPR are being followed and to improve the effectiveness of a partnership in achieving intermediate and long-term program objectives. This paper discusses the evaluation of the B Free CEED partnership coalition, describing the methods and findings of the process evaluation. In conclusion, the authors suggest that ongoing partnership evaluation is key in the reassessment of processes and procedures to improve partnership dynamics and cohesion. VanDevanter, N., Kwon, S., Sim, S., & Chun, K. (2011). Evaluation of community-academic partnership functioning: Center for the Elimination of Hepatitis B…

A community-university exchange project modeled after Europe’s science shope

This article describes a pilot project of the Morgridge Center for Public Service at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, which is based on the European-derived science shop model for democratizing campus-community partnerships using shared values of mutual respect and validation of community knowledge.  This science shop is called the Community University Exchange. The article analyzes how stakeholders have found meaning in the process of building an infrastructure to help create more authentic, reciprocal, and mutually beneficial campus-commu¬nity partnerships. This narrative describes the journey taken to develop the project and the direction for its future development. Tryon, E. & Ross, J.E. (2012). …

University-community partnerships: Bridging people and cultures in an HIV/AIDS health intervention in an African American community

In this article, members of the Communities and Health Disparities Project describe the project, which engaged North Carolina State University, a community-based organization, and members of the African American community to develop a culturally tailored toolkit to correct misinformation about HIV/AIDS. Through conducting the project, the authors identified five strategies for successfully building relationships across diverse cultural groups, which they present. Thompson, M. S., Head, R., Rikard, R. V., McNeil, C., & White, C. (2012). University-community partnerships: Bridging people and cultures in an HIV/AIDS health intervention in an African American community. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(2), 79-106. Full…

Meaningful relationships: Cruxes of university-community partnerships for sustainable and happy engagement

In this essay, the authors draw on organizational theory’s use of the metaphor as a way of understanding and explaining sustainable university-community partnerships. They argue that pursuing and maintaining meaningful partnerships between universities and communities or organizations in many ways parallels our efforts to sustain healthy romantic relationships. Through a description and analysis of 10 cruxes for sustaining long-term, healthy relationships, the authors offer a model for achieving intentional, ongoing, and systemic campus-community partnerships. Stewart, T., & Alrutz, M. (2012). Meaningful relationships: Cruxes of university-community partnerships for sustainable and happy engagement. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, 5(1), 44-55. Full Text.

Evolution in partnership: Lessons from the East St. Louis Action Research Project

This article describes the evolution of the University of Illinois’s East St. Louis Action Research Project (ESLARP), a 23 year-old community-university partnership program broadly dedicated to collaborating in teaching, research, and service. By analyzing ESLARP’s projects over the 23-year period and the personal reflections of two participants, the authors identify three phases of ESLARP—Neighborhoods First, Technical Assistance, and Engaged Research. The authors reflect on the evolution through these phases in order to gain insights into the negotiations required to sustain a university-community partnership program. Sorensen, J., & Lawson, L. (2012). Evolution in partnership: Lessons from the East St. Louis Action…

Engaging rural and urban appalachians in research using a community-based participatory research approach

This paper describes the development of two academic-community partnerships that took root in Appalachian communities, one urban and one rural. A CBPR approach was used to develop the partnerships. Although the initial focus for each community was to address obesity and diabetes risk, adherence to the CBPR approach led to different community identified prioritized needs and different pilot projects, and resulted in strong partnerships, each with improved capacity to address Appalachian health disparities in their communities. Smith, L. H., Valenzuela, J., & Ludke, R. L. (2012). Engaging rural and urban appalachians in research using a community-based participatory research approach. PRISM:…

Sustainable engagement? Reflections on the development of a creative community-university partnership

NEN University (NENu) was formed by San Francisco’s Neighborhood Empowerment Network (NEN) and the Institute for Civic and Community Engagement (ICCE) at San Francisco State University as community-university partnership designed to engage other Bay Area higher education institutions and community stakeholders in projects. In this piece, the author reflects on her role as an engaged scholar working in NENu, highlighting the successes and challenges associated with developing and sustaining innovative community-university partnerships. Shea, J. (2011). Sustainable engagement? Reflections on the development of a creative community-university partnership. Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, 4, 136-153. Full Text.

Instrument for Evaluating dimensions of group dynamics within community-based participatory research partnerships

This paper describes the development, adaptation, and use of an evaluation approach that assesses key dimensions of partnerships. The authors provide a review of relevant literature and present three case studies to demonstrate the use of this group dynamics evaluation instrument in community-based participatory research partnerships. The lessons learned from applying evaluation results, along with the potential, challenges, and areas for further development of these tools are discussed. Schulz, A.J., Israel, B.A., & Lantz, P. (2003). Instrument for evaluating dimensions of group dynamics within community-based participatory research partnerships. Evaluation and Program Planning, 26, 249-262. Full Text.

Community-academic partnerships and social change

This book chapter explains how partnerships between social epidemiology researchers and public health practitioners can be improved. The chapter addresses two questions, asked from the perspective of a community-based health program planner: (1) what kinds of evidence should social epidemiology produce to be of use in community-based practice? And, (2) what are the relational characteristics of a community-academic partnership that produces actionable evidence for social change? Schafer, P. (2012). Community-academic partnerships and social change. In O’Campo, P. & Dunn, J. (Eds.) Rethinking Social Epidemiology: Towards a Science of Change (285-304). New York: Springer. Full Text.

“It’s sweeter where the bruise is”: making sense of the experience of family homelessness in a campus-community partnership

This paper presents a case study that employed a hermeneutic research orientation, complemented by microstoria analysis, to provide an in-depth description of a young woman’s experience overcoming homelessness and participating in, and contributing to, a community-campus partnership. The author of the case study then reflects on her relationship with the young woman and the complexity of participating in a respectful relationship with her. She posits that by appropriately partnering with grassroots individuals with deep knowledge of homelessness and other social conditions, education institutions participate in enriching communities and help improve practice to ameliorate social problems. Sandy, M. (2013). “It’s sweeter…

Theoretical and applied perspectives on power: Recognizing processes that undermine effective community-university partnerships

This paper analyzes how elements of power impact the negotiation of engagement in community-university partnerships. The first section provides a hypothetical example of an engagement situation, in order to contextualize the power challenges that confront community partners and faculty members. The second section uses the hypothetical example to illustrate how differentials in power and need influence the engaged relationship. The third section provides three applied strategies for managing differentials in power and need in order to develop mutually beneficial and reciprocal university-community partnerships. Sandmann, L. R., & Kliewer, B. W. (2012). Theoretical and applied perspectives on power: Recognizing processes that…

Community-university partnerships in community based research

This paper begins by describing the experience of a group of university and community members who developed a set of guidelines for the ethical conduct of community-engaged research (CEnR) projects. The guidelines themselves are then presented, along with lessons learned from the process of collaborative guideline development. The paper concludes that the process of review and revision of the guidelines is extremely helpful for creating a framework that works for the specific communities and for strengthening the partnership by enabling all stakeholders to feel ownership and investment in the framework and collaborative research efforts. These guidelines may serve as an…