CATALOG DESCRIPTION

2 Credits. Basic methods for teaching art in the elementary school. The development of skills and creative behavior in children.

COURSE CONNECTION TO CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

As a reflective decision-maker, the student makes informed and ethical decisions and provides evidence of being a capable professional by developing and presenting lessons that demonstrate a respect for the developmental characteristics of young children. Students demonstrate the ability to create artwork and evaluate historical and cultural artwork using knowledge of art elements and principles of art and aesthetic theory.

ACADEMIC SERVICE-LEARNING

Due to the nature of the course content and the required 10 hour experience, this course is designated as an “academic service-learning” course. The assistance you provide in the classroom to the teacher and students during your academic service learning experience is a service to the school community. The faculty, administrators, staff, and students all benefit from interaction with you as a pre-professional, just as much as you will benefit from the experience. In this course you will be reflecting on your academic service learning experience and the impact on the school community as well as your professional development. At the end of the semester, please complete the academic service-learning survey and submit your signed Academic Service-Learning Log to the Weppner Center for Civic Engagement & Service. Once the survey is completed and your hours recorded, you will receive a 10-hour academic service-learning notation on your transcript.

Academic Service-Learning is pedagogy; it integrates intentional ways of community service with instruction and reflection. It is designed to enrich the learning experience through hands-on activity and to teach civic responsibility. Academic service learning encourages students to apply what they learned in the classroom and to reflect on their experiences by thinking, discussing, and writing about them. It also teaches students to apply academic knowledge to real-life civic issues and promotes teamwork and collaborative problem-solving, develops life skills, exposes students to the complexity of the human experience and challenges simplistic solutions, and makes learning more personally meaningful (Cross, L. 2008).

REQUIRED TEXT/MATERIALS

Clements, R. D. & Wachowiak, F. (2009). Emphasis art: A qualitative art program for elementary and middle schools (9th ed.). New York: Pearson Education, Inc.

SUGGESTED RESOURCES

  • Burnaford, G., Aprill, A., & Weiss, C. (Eds.). (2001). Renaissance in the classroom: Arts integration and meaningful learning. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Florida Department of Education. (1996). The arts for all students: The Florida pre-K-12 sunshine state standards and instructional practices. Tallahassee, FL: Author. Note: All Sunshine State Standards can be downloaded from: http://www.firn.edu/doe/curric/prek12/fram2.htm
  • Greenway, S. (2000). Art: An A-Z guide. New York: Franklin Watts.
  • Haring, K. (1997). I wish I didn’t have to sleep. New York: Prestel-Verlag.
  • Herberholz, B., & Herberholz, D. (2001). Artworks for elementary teachers with artstarts
  • (9th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Hurwitz, A., & Day, M. (1991). Children and their art. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  • Janson, H. W., & Janson, A. F. (2003). History of art (5th ed. revised). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
  • Krull, K. (1995). Lives of the artists: Masterpieces, messes, and what the neighbors thought. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company.
  • Lacey, S. (2001). Art for fun projects. Brookfield, CT: Copper Beech Books.
  • Ringgold, F. (1991). Tar beach. New York: Crown Publishers.

OTHER RESOURCES

  • Art Educators’ Summer Forum, Savannah College of Art and Design: www.scad.edu
  • Getting To Know The World’s Greatest Artists, a series of short books about individual artists by Children’s Press
  • Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education: www.lcinstitute.org
  • National Art Education Association: www.naea-reston.org (the publication list)
  • Florida Art Education Association: www.faea.org

GUIDELINES USED FOR DEVELOPING COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Florida Educator Accomplished Practices—Preprofessional= EAP
  • Subject Matter Content Standards for Florida Teachers- Elementary=FSMCS-Elem.
  • Subject Matter Content Standards for Florida Teachers—Art=FSMCS-ART
  • Subject Matter Content Standards for Florida Teachers—ESOL=ESOL
  • Association for Childhood Education International Standards= ACEI

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Students will identify the role and significance of visual art in relation to other disciplines. (FAU EAP: 8.1, 12.1; FSMCS- Elem.: 27.5, 27.6; FSMCS-ART: 17.1, 17.2, 18.1, 18.2, 18.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 4.2, 4.3; ACEI: 2.5, 2.8, 3.1)
  2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic visual art concepts and skills: elements and principles of design, and the ways they are used in communicating ideas, meanings, and emotions, through the creation of artwork in a variety of media appropriate for students in the elementary learning environment. (FAU EAP: 4.2, 5.2, 7.2, 8.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 28.4; FSMCS-ART: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4; ESOL: 17.1, 17.4, 17.5; ACEI: 2.5)
  3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in planning and presenting high quality lesson plans in diverse settings that correlate and integrate subject matter of other disciplines using grade level objectives and the Florida Sunshine State Standards. (FAU EAP: 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 10.1, 10.2, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 28.4, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 17.3, 18.4, 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.7, 16.2, 16.3, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5, 18.1; ACEI: 1.0, 2.5, 2.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 5.1, 5.2)
  4. Students will apply knowledge and higher order thinking when participating in art criticism, aesthetics, art production, and art history activities appropriate for diverse learners in the elementary learning environment. (FAU EAP: 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 11.1, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 29.3, 29.4, 30.2, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5, 16.1, 16.2; ESOL: 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5; ACEI: 2.5)
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify a variety of developmentally appropriate strategies and materials to assess skills, techniques, creativity, and communication in visual art for students in the elementary learning environment. (FAU EAP: 1.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS- Elem.: 31.2; FSAS-ART: 20.1, ESOL: 13.3, 13.7, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5;; ACEI: 4.0)
  6. Students will research and evaluate creative and higher order thinking activities for visual art using technology and electronic resources. (FAU EAP: 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.6; FSMCS-ART: 18.4; ESOL: 17.1, 17.4, 17.5;ACEI: 3.3)

CONTENT OUTLINE

A general guide subject to modification based upon class progress.

Week 1

  • Syllabus review and introductions. Conceptual Framework connections to this course discussed. Discussion of Art Education Portfolio, Critical Assignments -Art Integrated Unit Plan and Artworks and Mid Term and Final Exams, Group Presentations (Break into Groups by grade level), Academic Service Learning Project at Karen Slattery Educational Research Center for Child Development, Critical Response to Schmidt Gallery and Jaffe Book Arts Collection, and all other course requirements.
  • What is art? What are “qualitative” art activities?
  • Studio Activity: Name Art Design (Oil Pastel Activity- Blending and Mixing color), paper marbling, journal, complete Journal entry #1- Elements of Art (Line, Shape, Form, Color, Value, Space, Texture, Pattern- write definitions and illustrate).
  • Homework: Select an artist and research about them online. This artist will inspire you for the next class project. Research art lesson examples online that interest you. Bring in a printout of one lesson you would like to share with your group for the presentation. Read Chapters 1 (The Role of Art in Society and in the Schools), 2 (Art as Art: The Design Fundamentals), 3 (Teacher’ Role: Strategies and Management, 23 (Drawing) & 24 (Crayon and Oil Pastels). Write two paragraphs about your Best and Worst Teachers (no names of teachers, please). Consider how the performance of the teacher reflected being (or not being) a reflective, capable, ethical, informed decision maker (COE Conceptual Framework). Note: If you have any items for recycling such as plastic containers, bottles, boxes, etc. please bring to the next class for our recycled sculpture project.

Week 2

  • Discussion of chapters and effective/ineffective teacher paragraph. Work on 3D sculpture Name Art, Crayon Resist, and Crayon Engraving. Prepare Collograph Printing Plate for Sept. 16th. How to write an effective lesson plan. S.S.S. Lesson Plan Organization. Discuss Art Integrated lesson concerning content, appropriateness (age, ability, adaptation, diverse learners, ESOL, special needs, materials, etc.), and assessment.
  • Pre-Planning for Academic Service learning Project at Slattery Center.
  • Work in groups for presentation (K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Share artist information and lesson plan from online research with the group. Decide upon a lesson to present.
  • Homework: Read Chapters 4 (Motivating Learning), 5 (Creating and Evaluating Objectives), 6 (Integration in the 3 Domains: Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor), 7 (Art and Social Studies: Understanding the Contextual Approach to the Visual Culture), 8 (Art and Literacy: Reading and Language Arts), 9 (Art and Mathematics), 15 (Kindergarten), 26 (Paper Projects in Two-Dimensions), 25 (Painting), 27 (Printmaking), & 31 (Clay).

Week 3

  • Meet at the Slattery Early Childhood Education Center Academic Service learning project- Meet at the Slattery Early Childhood Education Center. We will be in 4 groups and work with the children on an art project. After the project we will discuss our ideas and experiences with the director of the Center. Write a reflection to share in class.
  • Homework: Read Chapters 10 (Art and Science), 14 (Cognitive and Psychological Factors in Children’s Learning and Creative Development), 16 (Grades 1 & 2), 17 (Grades 3 & 4), 18 (Grades 5 & 6), 20 (Teaching Art Appreciation: From Picture Study to Visual Culture), & 21 (Teaching Art History), Journal entry #2- Principles of Design (Balance and Symmetry/asymmetry)

Week 4

  • Share Academic Service learning reflections. Discussion of Chapters. Printmaking Studio Activity (Foam prints, glue-line, collograph). Ceramics – pinch pot method, coil method, and slabs with drape molds.
  • Homework: Complete Journal Entry #3- Variety, Emphasis, and Domination-Subordination- write definitions and illustrate.

Week 5

  • September 23rd MID TERM REVIEW covers Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16,17, 18, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, & 31
  • Homework: Journal Entry #4- Repetition and Pattern- write definitions and illustrate.

Week 6

  • September 30th Bring in Journals for Dr. Brown to grade during class.
  • Art Integration Lesson Plan review and examples discussed in class.
  • Glaze ceramics.
  • Homework: Work on Integrated Art Lesson Plan. Complete lesson plan for group presentations on October 14th.

Week 7

  • MID TERM EXAM

Week 8

  • October 14th Group Presentations. Bring a printout of the lesson plan for Dr. Brown to grade.
  • Discuss Drafts of Individual Art Integrated lesson plans.
  • Discuss concerning content, appropriateness (age, ability, adaptation, diverse learners, ESOL, special needs, materials, etc.), and assessment.
  • Homework: Journal Entry #5- Drawing outdoors- draw 2 sketches of landscapes (your choice) and Photograph the landscape bring in a print out of the photograph and Read Chapters 11 (Art and the Performing Arts), 22 (Teaching Art Criticism and Aesthetics), and 28 (Computer Art, Digital Photography, Video, and the Web)

Week 9

  • Class meets at the Schmidt Gallery
  • Art criticism at the Schmidt Gallery. The Schmidt Gallery in next to the theatre and inside the Performing Arts Building. At 8:50 I will be walking over from the classroom and anyone is welcome to join me. Just meet at the classroom by 8:50am and we will walk over together.
  • Homework: 12 (Teaching Art to Children with Special Needs), 13 (Teaching Art to Students Who are Gifted), Journal Entry #6 – What is Art? Bring into next class an object that you think is art and an object that you think is not art.

Week 10

  • October 28th Discussion of Students with special needs and gifted art students. Aesthetic discussion with art and non art objects.
  • Studio watercolor painting- landscapes
  • Share draft of art integrated lesson plan and work on the studio project for your lesson plan.
  • Begin Weaving with a cardboard loom.
  • Homework: Read Chapter 30 Crafts

Week 11

  • 10 am Class Meets in Boca
  • Library on the 3rd floor Jaffe Book Arts Collection 10 am Meet at the Library in the Jaffe Book Arts Collection 3rd floor.
  • Practice the Critique Process of Description, Analysis, Interpretation, and Evaluation. Discussion of what is art? Can books be art?Art criticism at the Schmidt Gallery. The Schmidt Gallery in next to the theatre and inside the Performing Arts Building. At 8:50 I will be walking over from the classroom and anyone is welcome to join me. Just meet at the classroom by 8:50am and we will walk over together.
  • Homework: Work on weaving. Read chapter- 29 (Three-Dimensional Design)

Week 12

  • November 11 No Class FAU is closed for Veteran’s day.

Week 13

  • November 18th All Assignments are due.
  • Styrofoam subtractive sculpture and Metal Repousse
  • Review for Final Exam covers chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 25, 27, 29, 30, 31

Week 14

  • November 25th Return all assignments. Complete sculpture. Bring in Journal for final grading.
  • December 4th as per the published final exam schedule 7:45-10:15am Final Exam 7:45- 10:15 am

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

C-F = Conceptual Framework connection to assignment
FAU EAP = Florida Educator Accomplished Practices—Preprofessional
FSMCS-Elem. = Subject Matter Content Standards for Florida’s Teachers
FSMCS-ART = Subject Matter Content Standards for Florida’s Teachers for Art
ESOL= English to Speakers of Other Languages, Florida K-12 Standards
ACEI= Association for Childhood Education International Standards
Critical Assignments for NCATE assessment must be completed by students enrolled in this course with a grade of C or better in order to receive a final grade of C or better for the course, regardless of grading average.

1. Critical Assignment – Examinations—30%- NCATE Assessment for EAP 8.1
Mid-Term Exam – 15%
Final Exam – 15%
Midterm and final exam reviews will be conducted in class. You may not use the text, study guides, notes, etc. during the exams. Make-up tests and exams are given only with an excused absence at the instructor’s discretion.
(C-F: The student gains information to become a reflective decision maker.
FAU EAP: 1.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 10.1, 10.2 ; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 28.4, 29.3, 29.4, 30.2, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5, 16.1, 16.2, 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 20.1, 20.2, 20.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 16.2, 16.3; ACEI: 1.0, 2.5, 2.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.0, 5.1)

2. Art Education Portfolio—5% The portfolio should include artwork you have created in the course. You should create a power point which includes photographs of all the artwork we have created this semester and insert a paragraph about one artwork that you think was the most successful or your favorite project. Please either print out thumbnails of the power point and bring in to class or email the power point to me (usually this works if you send through FAU email in three sections rather than one whole power point because of FAU file size limitations). Another option is to bring in your flash drive or burn a CD for me to view before or after class.
(C-F: As a reflective decision maker, students select resources from a variety of sources including technology and organize the resources in an accessible and informative way.
FAU EAP: 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 8.1, 8.2, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6; FSMCS-ART: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 18.1, 18.2, 18.3, 18.4; ESOL: 16.2, 16.3; ACEI: 2.5, 2.8, 5.1, 5.2)

3. Presentations – Group Presentation—10% Students divide into groups to represent grades K-5. Students share lesson plan ideas, choosing one to present. Students must provide a typed lesson plan for the instructor following the format given in class. The lesson plans should integrate art with another discipline, such as language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, etc. (C-F: As a reflective decision maker, the student demonstrates capable behaviors by researching, planning, organizing, and presenting art integrated lessons to peers which are age and grade appropriate.
FAU EAP: 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 10.1, 10.2, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 28.4, 29.4, 30.2, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 20.1, 20.2, 20.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.7, 16.2, 16.3, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5, 18.1; ACEI: 1.0, 2.5, 2.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.0, 5.1, 5.2)

4. Critical Response to Schmidt Gallery and Jaffe Book Arts Collection—5% This a written paper that describes, analyzes, interprets, and evaluates an original work of art viewed at an exhibition or art event. The paper will be given during the gallery visit and completed during class.
(C-F: As a reflective decision maker, the student selects an art exhibit or event and chooses to practice professional, ethical behaviors while attending and writes an informed critique of the event.
FAU EAP: 4.2, 6.1, 8.1, 11.1, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 28.4, 29.3, 29.4, 30.2; FSMCS-ART: 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5, 16.1, 16.2; ESOL: 12.1; ACEI: 2.5, 5.1)

5. Academic Service-Learning Experience, Class Work and Homework—25%
As part of the Class Work Homework grade, you are required to participate in the Academic Service-Learning project at the Karen Slattery Educational Research Center for Child Development. The Academic Service Learning Experience activities include, but are not limited to enhancing classroom appearance, planning and presenting a lesson, gathering materials for the lesson, attending and participating in pre-professional development activities and a reflection discussion at the Slattery Center with the Director of the Center and classroom teachers regarding the impact of the A S-L project on pre-K students. The reflective discussion will also be continued in class with Dr. Brown and the other students. In addition, a written self-reflection about the impact of the Academic Service-Learning experience on your professional growth connected to course learning and practices is required.
(C-F: The student observes and practices effective instruction to become a more capable, ethical, and reflective decision maker.) (EAP:1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12; FAU-EAP 6.1,6.2; ESOL 1.0, 3.1, 4.2, 5.4, 6.2, 6.10, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 12.1, 13.3, 15.2, 17.1, 18.1, 18.3, 20.3)

Assignments and studio projects in class are graded in proportion to the amount of class time assigned to the projects. Students are required to access and use Blackboard for this course. Each student must clean up after studio work is finished; actively participate in activities; and complete all requirements in a professional, ethical, and timely manner. Projects and activities that are completed in class and for homework are evaluated in part on the amount of work involved and the care and concern with which they are done. Assignments are due on the given date. Late work will not receive full credit. One class day late results in a loss of 10 points. An additional 5 points for each subsequent class late will be deducted. After two weeks, you will receive a zero for the assignment. All written assignments to be graded must be typed. Spelling and grammar are factored into the final grade.
(C-F: As a reflective decision maker, the student gains information, knowledge, and skills to become an informed, ethical, and capable professional.
FAU EAP: 1.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 10.1, 10.2, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 28.4, 29.3, 29.4, 30.2, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5, 16.1, 16.2, 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 20.1, 20.2, 20.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.7, 16.2, 16.3, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5, 18.1; ACEI: 1.0, 2.5, 2.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.0, 5.1, 5.2)

7. Critical Assignment – Art Integrated Lesson Plan with Artwork – 25%- NCATE assessment for EAP 8.1 & 10.1 This is a typed lesson plan that integrates Art with other disciplines such as, Mathematics, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, etc. The lesson plan also reflects the Discipline-based Art Education approach (DBAE) or what is now known as the Comprehensive Arts Education Approach to teaching. This approach integrates art learning in art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and studio production with other disciplines. You must create the artwork, which meets the objectives of the lesson plan. Please refer to the assignment sheet and criteria list given in class. (C-F; As a reflective decision maker, the student applies knowledge and skills acquired in the course to demonstrate their ability to become an informed and capable professional. FAU EAP: 1.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2, 6.1, 7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 10.1, 10.2, 11.1, 11.2, 12.1, 12.2; FSMCS-Elem.: 27.5, 27.6, 31.2; FSMCS-ART: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 7.3, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.4, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5, 16.1, 16.2, 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 20.1, 20.2, 20.3, 21.1, 21.2, 21.3, 21.4; ESOL: 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 13.3, 13.7, 16.2, 16.3, 17.1, 17.4, 17.5, 18.1; ACEI: 1.0, 2.5, 2.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.0, 5.1, 5.2)

TEACHING METHODOLOGIES

  • Lecture
  • Modeling
  • Guided Practice
  • Discussion
  • Presentations
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Internet Communication (use of e-mail, Web sites, Blackboard)
  • Power Point Presentations
  • Lesson Plan Writing
  • Use of LCD Projector, Videos, Computer
  • Studio Production using a variety of media

BIBLIOGRAPHY

A. Books
Alexander, K., & Day, M. (1991). Discipline-based art education: A curriculum sampler. Los Angeles: The Getty Center for Education in the Arts.

Anderson, T., & Milbrandt, M. K. (2005). Art for life: Authentic instruction in art.
New York: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Arnheim, R. (1974). Art and visual perception: A psychology of the creative eye.
Berkeley: University of California Press.

Atkins, R. (1990). Artspeak: A guide to contemporary ideas, movements, and buzzwords. New York: Abbeville Press.

Barkan, M. (1966). Through art to creativity. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Beattie, D. K. (1997). Assessment in art education. Worcester, MA: Davis
Publications, Inc.

Bruner, J. S. (1966). The process of education. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Burnaford, G. E., Aprill, A., & Weiss, C. (Eds.). (2001). Renaissance in the classroom: Arts integration and meaningful learning. Mahway, New Jersey: Lawrence
Erlbaum Associates.

Chapman, L. H. (1978). Approaches to art in education. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Dewey, J. (1934). Art as experience. New York: Minton, Balch.

Dobbs, S. M., Hermine, F., & MacGregory, R. (Eds). (1991). Research readings for
discipline based art education: A journey beyond creating. Reston, Virginia: National Art Education Association.
Edwards, L. C. (1997). The creative arts: A process approach for teachers and
children (2nd ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Feldman, E. B. (1996). Philosophy of art education. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Prentice Hall.

Florida Department of Education. (1996). The arts for all students: The Florida pre K-12 sunshine state standards and instructional practices. Tallahassee, FL: Author.

Florida Education Standards Commission. (1996). Teachers of the twenty-first century: Educator accomplished practices. Tallahassee, FL: author.

Greenway, S. (2000). Art: An A-Z guide. New York: Franklin Watts.

Haring, K. (1997). I wish I didn’t have to sleep. New York: Prestel-Verlag.

Herberholz, B., & Herberholz, D. (2001). Artworks for elementary teachers with artstarts (9th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill

Hobbs, J. A., & Rush, J. C. (1997). Teaching children art. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Prentice Hall.

Hume, H. D. (1990). A survival kit for the secondary teacher. West Nyack, NY: The Center for Applied Research in Education.

Hurwitz, A., & Day, M. (1991). Children and their art. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Janson, H. W., & Janson, A. F. (2003). History of art (5th ed. revised). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Krull, K. (1995). Lives of the artists: Masterpieces, messes, and what the neighbors thought. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company.

Lacey, S. (2001). Art for fun projects. Brookfield, CT: Copper Beech Books.

Linderman, M. G. (1997). Art in the elementary school (5th ed). Madison, WI: Brown & Benchmark.

Lowenfeld, V., & Brittain, L. Creative and mental growth (8th ed). Upper Saddle NJ: Prentice Hall.

McFee, J. K. (1970). Preparation for art. San Francisco: Wordsworth Publishing Co.

Michael, J. (1982). Lowenfeld lectures. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State
University Press.
Parks, M. E. (1994). The art teacher’s desktop reference. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Piaget, J. (1969). The psychology of the child. New York: Basic Books.

Qualley, C. (1986). Safety in the art room. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications.

Read, H. (1958). Education through art. New York: Pantheon Books.

Ringgold, F. (1991). Tar beach. New York: Crown Publishers.

Roberts, P. L., & Kellough, R. D. (1996). A guide for developing an interdisciplinary
thematic unit. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Simon & Schuster.

Schwartz, J. (1992). Purpose, principles, standards for school art programs. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association.

Spandorfer, M., Curtiss, D., & Snyder, J. (1992). Making art safely. New York: Van
Norstrand Reinhold.

Thompson, C. M. (Ed). (1995). The visual arts and early childhood learning.
Reston, VA: National Art Education Association.

Topol, C. W. (1992). Children and painting. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications.

Wong, H. K., & Wong, R. T. (1998). The first days of school. Mountain View, CA:
Harry K. Wong Publications.

Young, B. (Ed). (1990). Art, culture, and ethnicity. Reston, VA: National Art
Education Association.

B. JOURNALS:
Art Education, The Journal of the National Art Education Association
Arts Education Policy Review
Childhood Education
International Journal of Education & the Arts
Journal of Research in Childhood Education
School Arts
Studies in Art Education

C. INTERNET SITES: (Note: If the address is not given, search using the title or name of the site. Remember, URLs may change.)
1. Organizations
National Art Education Association
Florida Art Education Association
Palm Beach County Art Teachers Association
Getty Institute for the Arts (ARTSEDNET)

2. Reports and Standards
Florida Department of Education, Sunshine State Standards
National Art Education Association, Advancing Art Education Report

3. Resources (Materials, Lesson Plans, etc.)
Smithsonian American Art Museum http://www.mnaa.si.edu
Crayola Creativity Central http://www.crayola.com/educators
Kids Art http://www.kidsart.com
Art Education Resources http://www.cedarnet.org/emig/nj.html
Art Resources http://www.eduationindex.com/art
Multiple Intelligence Theory http://www.ncbe.gwu.edu