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  • Content tagged with : TRUCEN

    Placing scholarly engagement “on the desk”

    This essay focuses on the need to frame engagement as scholarship and to gain support for faculty members who do this type of work from institutional leaders. Sandmann, L. (2009). Placing scholarly engagement “on the desk.”

    Conceptualization of the scholarship of engagement in higher education: A strategic review, 1996-2006

    During the past decade, the generalized concept of the scholarship of engagement has evolved. Once a broad call for higher education to be more responsible to communities, it is now a multifaceted field of responses. This article describes the evolution of the term; then, to clarify the “definitional anarchy” that has arisen around its use, it explores the past decade’s punctuations in the evolutionary progress of the concept. Finally, it calls for moving beyond descriptive, narrative works to more critical, empirical research as well as policy analysis and introduces the possibility that the next punctuation will be the development of…

    Powerpoint presentation: Where is the scholarship in the scholarship of engagement?

    This presentation to the University of Southern Indiana looks at definitions of engagement, scholarship, scholarship of engagement, standards, and systems to support this work. Sandmann, L. (2004). Powerpoint presentation: Where is the scholarship in the scholarship of engagement? Full PowerPoint Presentation

    Peer research in action I: Models of practice

    This resource is the first paper of a three-part series by the Wellesley Institute that focuses on peer research models practiced in Toronto. The authors define peer research as, “a popular form of community-based research where community members are trained and supported to participate as co-researchers.” How have CBR partnerships defined peer research and integrated it into their CBR projects? What challenges have these research projects encountered in the peer research process? The Wellesley Institute conducted interviews and held focus groups to answer these questions, and identified three models of peer research: advisory, employment, and partner models. The study suggests…

    Presidents’ Declaration on the Civic Responsibility of Higher Education

    The purpose of this statement is to articulate the commitment of all sectors of higher education, public and private, two- and four-year, to their civic purposes and identify the behaviors that will make that commitment manifest. It was reviewed, refined and endorsed at a Presidents’ Leadership Colloquium convened by Campus Compact and the American Council on Education.  Presidents’ Fourth of July declaration on the civic responsibility of higher education (1999). Campus Compact. Full text.

    Faculty priorities reconsidered: Rewarding multiple forms of scholarship

    This book features case studies of nine institutions grappling with reform of faculty roles and rewards and how institutional cultures, values, history, type, and internal and external forces influenced their efforts. The case studies are sandwiched between chapters tracing the history of the movement to redefine scholarship and the impact of this movement at the national level, and concludes with a guide to “best practices, strategies, and campus examples” and lessons learned from an inquiry into the scholarly work of faculty. While not focused on community-engaged scholarship per se, the book includes references to this work providing a rich institutionally…

    The challenges and opportunities of engaged research

    The use of engaged methods such as collaborative university-community research, is examined as a way of strengthening traditional academic research. Particular focus is placed on a collaborative model combining university-based and community-based knowledge. The Loyola University Chicago Center for Urban Research and Learning is used as a case study. The incorporation of grassroots research into broader research initiatives promises to increase the quality of research and connections among communities at national and international levels. Nyden, P. (2006) The challenges and opportunities of engaged research. In Silka, L., ed., Scholarship in action: Applied research and community change (HUD’s Office of University…

    Points of distinction: A guidebook for planning and evaluating quality outreach

    This guidebook encourages discussion about the values and evidence associated with quality outreach and engagement. Four dimensions of quality outreach include: significance, context, scholarship, and impact. Components, sample evaluation questions, and qualitative and quantitative indicators for each dimension are suggested as rigorous ways for both individual faculty and academic units to plan, document, and evaluate outreach scholarship. Michigan State University Committee on Evaluating Quality Outreach. (1996, 2000). Points of distinction: A guidebook for planning and evaluating quality outreach. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Outreach and Engagement. Full Text.

    Powerpoint slide: Is it engaged scholarship? An exploratory assessment heuristic to assist campuses in determining whether or not a community-engaged project qualifies as engaged scholarship

    This heuristic or an adaptation thereof may be useful to campus administrators and faculty in distinguishing engaged scholarship from other forms of scholarship at their university. Howard, J. (2007) Powerpoint slide: Is it engaged scholarship? An exploratory assessment heuristic to assist campuses in determining whether or not a community-engaged project qualifies as engaged scholarship. University of Michigan. Powerpoint Slide.  

    Powerpoint slide: Distinguishing engaged scholarship from faculty volunteering and professional service

    Volunteering may benefit a community, but it doesn’t necessarily draw on the faculty member’s expertise nor advance her/his scholarship. Professional service draws on the faculty member’s expertise but doesn’t advance her/his scholarship. Engaged scholarship necessarily taps the faculty member’s expertise and advances her/his scholarship. Howard, J. (2007). Powerpoint slide: Distinguishing engaged scholarship from faculty volunteering and professional service. University of Michigan. Powerpoint Slide.

    Powerpoint slide of a Venn diagram that reflects the three essential components of engaged scholarship

    Howard, J. (2007). Powerpoint slide of a Venn diagram that reflects the three essential components of engaged scholarship: involves the community, benefits the community, and advances the faculty member’s scholarship. University of Michigan. Powerpoint Slide.

    Models of engaged scholarship: An interdisciplinary discussion

    This article reports on discussions of an interdisciplinary group of scholars at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) on various models of engaged scholarship in anthropology, public health, communications and other social and behavioral sciences, and the new ways of understanding engaged scholarship that are emerging at UNC and other research universities. The models examined are: community-based participatory research; public anthropology and sociology; critical race theory; public dialogues; “crisis disciplines”; and social entrepreneurship. The authors identify core themes and “problematics” across the models and offer suggestions for future research and practice. Holland, et al. (2010). Models of…

    Understanding an emerging field of scholarship: Toward a research agenda for engaged, public scholarship

    This article synthesizes contributions to two special issues of the Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement (Volume 12) to develop a comprehensive view of this emerging field, ‘which as yet has many names and a number of different emphases, conceptualizations, and research questions.’ It argues that only an engaged process can ultimately clarify this emerging field and enable it to move forward with a research agenda. Such a process would include practitioner and community voices, be interactive, and be encouraged and supported by additional outlets for scholarly exploration. Giles, D.E., Jr., (2008). Understanding an emerging field of scholarship: Toward…

    Coming to critical engagement: an autoethnographic exploration

    This volume is an outgrowth of discussion generated through and by faculty members of the engaged learning community at Michigan State University. It uses a blend of scholarly and personal inquiry coupled with collegial discourse to examine the nature of scholarly engagement. Descriptions of personal journeys in navigating university and community systems, examination of the ethics and value of the work are combined with theory and critical reflection to provide authentic and meaningful views of engaged scholarship. Fear, F., Rosaen, C., Bawden, R., & Foster-Fishman, P. (2006). Coming to critical engagement: an autoethnographic exploration: Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

    The promise of a scholarship of engagement

    The author discusses the key elements of participatory action research and the importance of engaging with the community population rather than social service providers, and provides some principles of good practice. He describes a case study that involved him and his students. Couto, R. (2001). The promise of a scholarship of engagement. Academic Workplace, 4-7. Full text

    The university in national development: The role of use-inspired research

    This essay by a University of Cape Town professor of sociology summarizes his community-engaged research concerns and activities, and proposes an investigation and theorization of how universities might become more deeply engaged with civil society, particularly with respect to research relations with local and regional government bodies, community and civic organizations, labor and other non-governmental organizations etc. Cooper, D. (2009). The university in national development: The role of use-inspired research. Proposed comparative case studies of community-engaged research. Original Toolkit essay: Full Text.

    Linking scholarship and communities: Report of the Commission on Community-Engaged Scholarship in the Health Professions

    This comprehensive report, focused on the health professions, reviews a conceptualization of engaged scholarship, identifies the significant gap that exists between the promise of health professional schools as engaged institutions and the reality of how faculty members are typically judged and rewarded, and makes recommendations on how to close this gap. It acknowledges that recognizing and rewarding community engaged scholarship in the health professions will require changes not only in the wording of institutional policies and procedures but in the culture of institutions and professions. Leadership is needed from academic institutions and the external stakeholders that influence their values and…

    Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate

    This seminal work on the four types of scholarship–discovery, integration, application, and teaching–led the way for Boyer’s subsequent naming of the scholarship of engagement in his 1996 Journal of Public Service and Outreach article. Boyer, E. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate. Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Full text.

    The scholarship of engagement

    In this article, Boyer coined the term “scholarship of engagement” and discussed its relationship to his reconceptualization of scholarship as discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Posted with permission of the Journal of Public Service and Outreach (now the Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement). Boyer, E. (1996). The scholarship of engagement. Journal of Public Service and Outreach, 1(1), 11-20. Full text.

    Dewey’s dream: Universities and democracies in an age of education reform

    In this section of the book, the authors assert that by working toward solving the overall problems of the public school system, the University of Pennsylvania will be much better able to achieve its traditional mission to advance, preserve, and transmit knowledge. At the same time, the University will help produce well-educated citizens necessary for a genuine democratic society. Benson, L. Harkavy, I., & Puckett, J. (2007). Dewey’s dream: Universities and democracies in an age of education reform (especially pp. 77-113). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.