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  • Content tagged with : knowledgehubs

    Responding to Charlottesville

    Initial Contributors: Nontalie Morrow, Danielle Leek, Liza Blomquist In the days and weeks following monumental displays of racism, violence, and oppression, such as those that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12th, many are left uncertain of “where to go from here”. While there is not one right way to heal or move forward from these events, progress is more likely to occur if there are opportunities and resources available to those who are searching for growth. The following links may be valuable for higher education professionals looking for ways to address these issues in the classroom and on-campus. RESOURCES…

    Institutional Assessment

    Initial curators: Tabitha Underwood, Missouri Campus Compact & H. Anne Weiss, Indiana Campus Compact Introduction The next step after signing the Action Statement, is to develop a meaningful and strategic civic action plan. To do so, a campus must first understand its current state of engagement; to plan for future action, one must understand their starting point. This entails a self-assessment of engagement across a variety to indicators, putting tracking and monitoring into place, and utilizing national data and trends to inform the plan and future practice. An institutional self-assessment will include a comprehensive examination of the following themes and…

    Assessment of Students’ Civic Learning and Development

    Initial curator: H. Anne Weiss, Indiana Campus Compact Introduction As mentioned in the Action Statement, one vital responsibility of higher education institutions is to prepare our students for lives of engaged citizenship, with the motivation and capacity to deliberate, act, and lead in pursuit of the public good. Being able to measure and share the outcomes your students achieve due (in part) to the community engagement activities they participated in through your institution is something we hope all of our partner institutions aspire to accomplish. We are all familiar with the adage that students receiving a degree should learn something and…

    Aligning Institution to Community

    Initial curator: Steve Dubb, Democracy Collaborative Introduction Universities are anchor institutions because, once established, it is hard to move location, both because of sunk capital and because of ownership status (the overwhelming majority of universities being either publicly owned or nonprofit). Adopting an anchor mission, however, implies more than merely being an anchor institution. Rather, it implies adopting a strategy to leverage institutional assets.  As Rita Hodges and Steve Dubb write in The Road Half Traveled, an institution that adopts an anchor mission decides to “consciously and strategically apply the institution’s long-term, place-based economic power, in combination with its human…

    Increasing College Access

    Initial curator: Rania Ezzo, Campus Compact, AmeriCorps*VISTA Introduction As mentioned in the Action Statement, higher education is the bedrock of a just, equitable, and sustainable future. Understanding that higher education institutions are responsible for preparing students to be engaged citizens, we together strive for the highest possible level of inclusivity. College access is central to this inclusivity, making possible a strong, healthy, active democratic society. If you know of resources that you would like to contribute to this knowledge hub, please contact Maggie Grove at mgrove {at} compact(.)org   Key resources A) Gaining Institutional Support Achieving Higher Levels of Access and Success in…

    Building Deep and Sustainable Connections among Sport, Academics and Community

    Initial curators: Kerrissa Heffernan, Brown University & Eli Wolff, Brown University Introduction Most universities and colleges believe athletics to be a critical part of the academic experience. Sport programs enhance the university’s reputation and teach student athletes important life lessons about perseverance, cooperation and leadership that complement the academic mission. However, the significant demands of sport can isolate athletes from the larger student population and contribute to a disparaging stereotype of athletes as less engaged in the life of the university and in the community. The response of many universities is to develop separate service initiatives for athletes, however these…

    Civic Engagement and Sustainability Education

    Initial curator: Kim Coleman, Vermont Campus Compact Introduction The term “sustainability education” refers to a teaching approach that uses innovative pedagogy, such as service-learning and project-based learning, to encourage students to think critically and take action towards a sustainable future. Sustainability education is receiving increasing attention on college campuses, e.g. the University of Vermont now has a sustainability general education requirement for all of its undergraduate students. Educators and administrators interested in integrating sustainability into their courses and departments may consider civic engagement as a mechanism for creating meaningful experiences at the intersection of sustainability and their respective disciplines. For…

    Dialogue Resources for Higher Education

    Initial curator: Sustained Dialogue Institute Introduction What is dialogue? Dialogue is a process in which groups come together to share experiences around issues that are often avoided or argued toward the goal of informed decision-making. Dialogue involves mutual understanding, suspending judgment and listening deeply, rather than seeking to win.[1] What can it do for my campus? Why consider it as part of my civic action plan? Campuses engaged in dialogue use the tool to engage with diverse viewpoints in true civil discourse. A community that has a high level of dialogue skill creates enhanced experiences in co-curricular life, civic engagement,…