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  • Content tagged with : globalsl

    East Coast Institute: Community-based Global Learning & Critical Global Citizenship

    Community-based Global Learning Institute Haverford College August 7 – 9, 2018 Register Drawing on 10 years of collaboration between and among Amizade, Cornell University, and The Globalsl Network, The 10th Annual institute will proceed through thematic focus on the relationship of engaged learning to categories of citizenship and inclusion, through variously contested spaces, in our current political moment. The Institute is for faculty, administrators, practitioners, community partners, and researchers who are interested in community-engaged learning, working across cultures and with awareness of global context, at home and abroad. It is uniquely designed to be collaborative, open, and participatory. Photo Credit:…

    Higher Education & Global Development – A Conversation at the Notre Dame Summit

    In some sense ,“critical” development points to a tradition that is anti-hegemonic, questioning, and concerned about dominant forms of engagement with “development.” In another sense, “critical” development points to development that is most needed, that is vital – the kind of structural changes that lead to lives longer lived.   Individuals with roots in both of these approaches will be central to the initial evening conversation at GSL5: Dignity and Justice in Global Service-Learning. We will hear from Jennifer Lentfer, identified on her Twitter handle as “(re)sister of ahistorical or apolitical social change efforts,” Director of Communications for 1,000 Currents,…

    Assessing global learning: Global Engagement Survey 2017

    By Nora Pillard Reynolds Click here for PDF of the 2017 Global Engagement Survey Executive Summary  Click here for PDF of the full 2017 Global Engagement Survey Report The Global Engagement Survey (GES) is a multi-institutional assessment tool that employs quantitative and qualitative methods to better understand relationships among program variables and student learning, in respect to global learning goals identified by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U, 2014), with adaptations particularly relevant to community-engaged global learning . The GES therefore considers global learning in respect to the three components of global citizenship, cultural humility, and critical reflection….

    A Nation of Immigrants? The Politics of Educating for Global Citizenship

    Eric Hartman, Haverford College and globalsl   The recent removal of “nation of immigrants” from the mission statement of The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is one more move in a series of actions through which President Trump re-centers and validates the role of white supremacy in the historical trajectory of the nation. I review some of these actions below, dusting off some of the basic truths frequently obscured by this administration, before suggesting how higher education should respond. The President asked in January, “Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?” Most people migrate…

    Creating Global Citizens in the Classroom: Nobis Global Action Model

    Christen Higgins Clougherty, Ph.D., Founder and Executive Director of the Nobis Project Education has the power to rekindle the connection between citizenry, ethics and empathy. Since our founding in 2008 we have been listening to the struggles teachers are facing in finding ways to make these connections and bring the world into their classrooms. Nobis Project is excited to announce the launch of our free ebook and accompanying workbook with lesson plans. Ebook – http://bit.ly/Nobis2018eBook Workbook – http://bit.ly/Nobis2018LessonPlans Our ebook outlines the benefits and step-by-step strategies for implementing globally focused projects in your classroom. This model can also be used…

    What is globasl? Seeking Global Citizenship and an Invitation to Contribute

    By Eric Hartman At globalsl, we aim to offer weekly blogs on global citizenship work – snapshots of happenings, readings, and resources that are relevant for others supporting the work of community-campus collaboration to honor and advance human dignity, locally and internationally. Here’s some background on how globalsl and I got here. The gathering of resources and community at globalsl began through a couple key moments, including the interest and leadership of institutions that advanced the 2nd International (now Global) Service-Learning Summit. But a great deal of globalsl origins also tracks back to my personal experimentation with online reflection and…

    Global citizenship, ignorance, and the power of travel

    Sarah Stanlick, Lehigh University In late-December/early January, I had the honor and pleasure of accompanying our Global Citizenship Program students on their winter trip to Peru.  Each year, 23 students who have been selected through a highly-competitive application process travel together to what could be considered a “non-traditional” study abroad location.  The trip to Peru, the scope of our Global Citizenship Program, and recent “Presidential comments,” lead me to the topic of this post – what counts as “traditional” and why must we encourage and enable more young people to have “non-traditional” experiences? For many, when the topic of study…

    Clear as day, hard to see: The way power blinds us to bad outcomes in international volunteering

    Eric Hartman, Haverford College & globalsl  For more than twenty years, I’ve been working to promote GOOD community-engagement and partnership work, variously called service, service-learning, volunteering, and community-based learning. Since 2014, I’ve been part of two global networks, The GASP Working Group and the Better Volunteering, Better Care initiative, that specifically discourage two common types of volunteering: un-credentialed medical brigades and volunteering in orphanages. I’m going to briefly breakdown why these global networks of medical doctors, human rights lawyers, Save the Children and UNICEF fight these two types of volunteering. Then I’m going to share why it’s so hard for…

    Exercise and Civic Engagement: 2 Podcasts that Deepen Thinking on Our Commitments to One Another

    Eric Hartman, Haverford College & globalsl  Like many folks in professional roles, I often sit at a desk – yet I want to stay in shape. In November I upped my jogging and walking efforts in a monthly Fitbit competition that I have so far lost throughout the year. Several of the outcomes were wonderful: it forced me to identify meetings and calls that can be taken while walking (not all, but many); it got me outside more often with family members; and even though I moved in silence for several of those early morning hours, it led me through extended…

    The Public Purposes of Higher Education: Three False Dichotomies

    Eric Hartman While recently moderating a panel on Human Rights Pedagogy and Practice, I was struck by the panelists’ collective, effective erasure of a number of dichotomies in the discourse around community-campus partnerships. First, it’s not community OR campus; we need better language than community-campus partnerships. Campuses are not so exceptional that they might be exempted from geographic space or history. They are places that include diverse and interlocking memberships, power structures, privileges, and exclusions. To frame work through the language of campus-community creates three problems. Campus-community language overstates the separation between the two. Students, staff, and faculty members live,…

    A 14 year journey: (Just a few of) my “take aways” building, sustaining, and transitioning a small NGO

    By Nora Pillard Reynolds, Co-founder and outgoing Executive Director of Water for Waslala; Incoming Editor of globalsl When I was 21, I spent the two weeks after college graduation on a trip with friends in Waslala, Nicaragua. The trip led me to co-found Water for Waslala, which was acquired by WaterAid & El Porvenir on April 1, 2016.  In many ways, this story represents our collective aspirations for GSL – an experience that shaped a young person’s personal and professional paths, prolonged engagement with many individuals and organizations in Waslala over 14 years and counting, an opportunity for hundreds of…

    Sustained Rights Inquiry (Part 2 of 2): Teaching, Preaching, and Socialization

    By Eric Hartman, Executive Director of the Center for Peace at Global Citizenship at Haverford College Reposted with permission. Originally written for Gristwood A., & Woolf, M., (Eds.). (2017). Civil Rights and Inequalities. The CAPA Global Education Network Series. https://www.capa.org/publications *The author would like to thank Professors Kaye Edwards, Thomas Donahue, Carol Schilling, and Anne Preston, as well as CPGC staff members Janice Lion and Stephanie Zukerman, for their feedback on earlier versions of this article. Photo Credit: Thomas Donahue Teaching, Preaching, and Socialization   The prompt for this collection includes the question, “How do we avoid (and should we avoid) the…

    Student learning in short-term education abroad: Introducing new measures of global engagement

    Anthony Ogden (Michigan State University); Lisa Chieffo (University of Delaware); Eric Hartman (Haverford College) The popularity of short-term education abroad has sparked scholarly interest in understanding and documenting the various outcomes associated with program duration. At the Forum of International Education’s 13th Annual Conference from March 29-31, 2017, the authors presented a session featuring recent studies and debuting the Global Engagement Measurement Scale (GEMS) and the Global Engagement Survey (GES). Institutions interested in becoming part of the GES may contact Dr. Nora Reynolds directly at npreynolds {at} haverford(.)edu. Please find the session information below: Presentation slides: Student learning in short-term education abroad…

    CUGH Global Health Education Competencies Tool Kit

    The Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) is a membership organization for institutions involved in higher education and global health – including education, research, and practice. The CUGH Competency Sub-Committee of the Education Committee has been instrumental in defining competencies for global health education and professional development, as well as exploring ongoing conversations and controversies around global health competencies and careers. In 2015, the Competency Sub-Committee and collaborators published a seminal article in the Annals of Global Health defining levels of proficiency, as well as desirable competencies for two levels- the global citizen level and the basic operational program…

    Personal Reflection, Purposefully Shared: Techniques for Processing International Experiences Along the Continuum

    Meghan Ozaroski, Assistant Director of Northwestern University’s Global Engagement Studies Institute (GESI), will be presenting with program alums Ariel and Danielle at The Forum on Education Abroad’s 13th Annual Conference to introduce this reflective practice curriculum. Reflective practice: Introduction to Open Letters International experiences necessarily force us to contend with identity, privilege, and ethical engagement at the individual and community level. Although widely embraced in the service-learning community of practice (Ash and Clayton, 2009; Correia and Bleicher, 2008), meaningfully structured and continuously shared reflection along these lines is still often missing in many international education programs. The Global Engagement Studies…

    Sustained Rights Inquiry: Before, During, and After Summer Internships (Part 1 of 2)

    By Eric Hartman*, Executive Director of the Center for Peace and Global Citizenship at Haverford College Reposted with permission. Originally written for Gristwood A., & Woolf, M., (Eds.). (2017). Civil Rights and Inequalities. The CAPA Global Education Network Series. https://www.capa.org/publications *The author would like to thank Professors Kaye Edwards, Thomas Donahue, Carol Schilling, and Anne Preston, as well as CPGC staff members Janice Lion and Stephanie Zukerman, for their feedback on earlier versions of this article. Photo Credit: Thomas Donahue This volume orients itself on an issue that human rights scholars have recognized as a central tension: that states have been the…

    Social Innovation and Civic Engagement: Toward a Shared Future?

    *This is an excerpt of McBride, A.M. & Mlyn, E. (2016). Social Innovation and civic engagement: Towards a shared future? Diversity & Democracy, 19(3). Retrieved from www.aacu.org.  You can find the full article here. By Amanda Moore McBride (Milton Morris Dean and professor in the Graduate School of Social Work at the University of Denver)  & Eric Mlyn (assistant vice provost for civic engagement, Peter Lange Executive Director of DukeEngage, and lecturer in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University) Look at the traffic in your email inbox over the last week. If your inbox looks like ours, take note of…

    The importance of cultural humility: Online module

    This lesson plan and module was created by Sarah Richards-Desai, MSW, in conjunction with Dr. Laura Lewis, assistant dean for global partnerships and co-director of the Institute on Sustainable Global Engagement at the University at Buffalo The State University of New York. This online learning module is designed to facilitate skills for effective cross cultural communication and collaboration. The very important concept of cultural humility is a central focus. Cultural humility entails acknowledging difference, and positioning ourselves as people interested in learning and understanding. Cultural humility is particularly relevant to a trauma-informed, human-rights-based approach to social work practice; it underscores the dignity and value of the…

    Staying Safe and Sane in Difficult Places

    By Richard Slimbach, Professor, Department of Global Studies, Sociology, and TESOL at Azusa Pacific University Independent travel in difficult places throughout the global South presents a unique set of challenges. Sickness and disease is rampant. Roads are treacherous and buses old and overcrowded. Thieves are ever on the prowl for unsuspecting innocents. Women—especially foreign women—are easy targets for sexual harassment and even assault. Conditions like these give rise to the tragic stories we often hear: of student-travelers being bed-ridden with dysentery or malaria, being robbed of all they have, or narrowly avoiding rape or a traffic death. I’d like to…

    #AIEA2017 Transcending Boundaries, Transdisciplinarity, & Ethical Global Engagement

    I’m honored to be presenting on transdisciplinary practice and ethical global engagement with several insightful colleagues this week at the Association of International Education Administrators Annual Conference. Presentations times, titles, abstracts, and slides are all available below. Monday, February 20, 12:30pm: Linking Silos: International Educators as Transdisciplinary Bridge-Builders This session looks at International Education scholar-practitioners working across silos in creative and impactful ways.  Presenters will briefly highlight three models including the development of deliberate faculty-staff learning communities, a project linking SIOs and Historians, and the potential in forms of writing that resist categorization.  Participants will draw on their own practice and…