Michigan Journal Fall 2014: The Complete Special Section on Global Service-Learning

February 9, 2015

The Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning Editor, Jeffrey Howard, has graciously agreed to allow us to post all three of the articles that were part of the global service-learning special section in the Fall 2014 issue of the journal.  The introduction to the special section, by Hartman & Kiely, has already been posted here. Below please find McMillan & Stanton’s “’Learning Service’ in International Contexts: Partnership-based Service-Learning and Research in Cape Town, South Africa,” as well as Pillard Reynold’s, “What Counts as Outcomes? Community Perspectives of an Engineering Partnership.”

“Learning Service” in International Contexts: Partnership-based Service-Learning and Research in Cape Town, South Africa

Janice McMillan, University of Cape Town

Timothy K. Stanton, Stanford University

In this paper we explore an approach to developing and implementing service-learning and community-based research in a study-abroad program in Cape Town, South Africa. Drawing on a notion of partnerships reflecting the values of accompaniment and transparency, and influenced by the importance of learning service, we outline an intentional, engaged pedagogy and program design emphasizing collaborative inquiry and partnership development. However, such an approach is challenging and demands that we include an ontological project as part of our work. This, we believe, is crucial if global service-learning (GSL), often taking place in the Global South, is to become a robust, critical, and ethical practice. View the entire article. 

What Counts as Outcomes?
Community Perspectives of an Engineering Partnership

Nora Pillard Reynolds, Temple University

This study explored the perspectives of community organization representatives and community residents about a partnership between a College of Engineering and a rural municipality in Nicaragua. The intended community outcomes described by university participants during interviews corresponded with tangible project outcomes, such as access to clean drinking water and electricity as well as improved access to healthcare services. However, the community participants also described the following community outcomes: confianza, sense of pride, and consciencia. Comments about using the community as a laboratory illuminate how categorizing outcomes as positive or negative represents an oversimplification and draw attention to the importance of community participation in various ways including data analysis. Findings are analyzed using Fraser’s framework for social justice and provide a model for enacting global service-learning partnerships with the potential to advance social justice. View the entire article.

 

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