Content with Disciplines : Social Services

Ethical Global Engagement: Comhlámh, Reciprocal Public Benefit, & Fair Trade Learning – March 2 WEBINAR

Join us on Wednesday, March 2, at noon EST, for an engaging discussion of ethics in international volunteering and global service-learning. Three individuals representing practice, standards, and scholarship supporting ethical approaches to international volunteering, global service-learning, and global community engagement partnerships will convene to briefly share the approaches they represent. They will then engage in questions and conversation with one another and webinar participants. The webinar is designed to be exploratory and discursive rather than strictly instructive in terms of one particular standards approach. It is recommended for intermediate and advanced scholars and practitioners involved with study abroad, service-learning, community…

Visual Art & Social Entrepreneurship SL Course

COURSE UNDERPININGS Social entrepreneurs are innovators who focus on designing and creating concrete products and services that address social needs and problems. Unlike scalable startups the goal of a social entrepreneur is to seed awareness of organizer collaboration and effective business models for creating micro-enterprise. The Chesapeake Arts Center (CAC) located in the middle of the community will serve as a secure place to foster, stimulate and sustain the “culture” of place through the management of an accessible maker-space and workshop. The culture of Brooklyn-Curtis Bay (southeast Baltimore City) and northeast Anne Arundel County is fragmented and complicated by the…

CBPR with service providers: Arguing a case for engaging practitioners in all phases of research

This literature review focuses on ways that professional service providers (those with specialized skills, training, and knowledge) have engaged in CBPR, experienced benefits from their engagement, contributed to health promotion research, and faced challenges in collaboration. The authors discuss the implication of these topics on policy and practice. Spector, A.Y. (2012). CBPR with service providers: Arguing a case for engaging practitioners in all phases of research. Health Promotion Practice, 13 (2), 252-258. Full Text.

Involving urban planning, social work, and public health faculty members in the civic renewal of the research university

What are some strategies for involving urban planning, social work, and public health faculty members in the civic renewal of the research university? At a time when citizens have “disengaged from democracy,” and universities have deemphasized their civic mission, this article examines ways in which these faculty members might join together and formulate strategies which complement their shared professional and public purposes on campus and in the community. Checkoway, B. (2008). Involving urban planning, social work, and public health faculty members in the civic renewal of the research university. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 27(4), 507-511.

Leadership: Taking Responsibility for Our Communities, and Making Them Better Through Public Action

Course Goals & Objectives It is the premise of this course that leadership is a concept worth trying to understand as a process in which all can participate to varying degrees.  The underlying philosophy can be summarized as follows: we can identify characteristics of leadership; These characteristics are “learned” in some way that we can understand; and we can nurture this learning experience in a formal academic environment. From the definition leadership printed at the top of the syllabus, it should be clear that this course has a strong civic engagement component.  Our understanding of leadership is grounded in the…

Community Development

Course Description This course examines methods of community development for a diverse democracy. It assesses the ways in which people join together, take initiative, and develop community-based programs, with or without assistance by outside agencies. It analyzes core concepts of community development, steps in the process, and perspectives on future practice in a society which values diversity as an asset. The course assumes that community members are active participants and competent citizens who mobilize resources and build upon strengths, rather than problems in society or passive recipients of services. Emphasis is placed on increasing involvement of traditionally underrepresented groups in…

Leadership and Management of Nonprofit Organizations

This course is designed to: Introduce you to the U.S. nonprofit sector encouraging you to explore the differences and similarities between managing in the for profit and nonprofit sectors; explores distinctive characteristics of the nonprofit sector; Introduce you to concepts, best practices, opportunities, and challenges of managing and leading nonprofit organizations; Provide frameworks and tools that will help you be more effective participants, managers and/or leaders in this arena, and Provide an opportunity for you to learn first hand the challenges and rewards of philanthropy. Course Methodology: The course will be taught using a variety of lectures, discussions, case study…

Policies and Services that Enhance Community Participation and Well-Being

Course Description This course will analyze those policies and services that promote or inhibit the development of civil society, enhance or deny human rights, and contribute to the attainment of social justice or sustain the existence of social injustice. Emphasis will be placed on those policies and services which serve to enhance social participation, economic security, respect for diversity, voluntary action, and community and corporate responsibility. The course will also integrate an intensive focus on how policies and services, particularly at the local level, maintain or diminish the existence of oppression and privilege in U.S. society. Programs provided by various…

Rebuilding the Mississippi Gulf Coast

Course Overview: The purpose of this course is to engage students in the rebuilding process, including the principles, concepts, processes and practice related to disaster recovery currently used in the United States. Course Objectives: You should upon completion of this course: Gain an understanding of post-disaster planning; Understand the key elements of comprehensive planning; Engage in effective service-learning; Organize and participate in large-scale community meetings, stakeholder meetings, and meetings with individuals; Be able to communicate in a collaborative work team and; Improve your research and writing skills. Assigned Reading Daniels, Thomas, John Keller, Lapping, Mark, Daniels, Katherine and James Segedy….

Rebuilding the Mississippi Gulf Coast

Course Description Consumer problems related to production and allocation of housing, especially for low-income households. Includes service-learning experience related to data collection, analysis and reporting in the context of neighborhood development. Course Prerequisites: ECON 200 and FmResM 340 Objectives When finished with this course, the successful student will be able to (1) Understand importance of housing in US society; (2) Identify institutions and special interests involved in the production, maintenance, regulation and distribution of housing; (3) Compare and evaluate alternative solutions to housing problems; (4) Collect, interpret, and report housing data. Course Reading Materials Medoff, P., & Sklar, H. (1994)….

Intercultural and Minority Relations

Catalogue Description: Dynamics of intercultural and intergroup relations using assignments to develop cross-cultural understanding, empathy, communication skills; application of theory to social issues and social work practice. Student Academic Outcomes: (What the student who successfully and satisfactorily completes the course should know or be able to do): Consistent with the WSSS Mission and the CSWE educational standards, the academic outcomes listed below include professional social work foundation content related to social work values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations-at-risk. Knowledge Understand historical and contemporary mechanisms used to oppress minority groups. Understand the affective and cognitive dimension of one?s…

Working for Global Justice

Overview: Goal of the course: to assist you to integrate a commitment to social justice into your lives and careers. You will learn: to advocate for social justice to use your professional skills and knowledge to work for social justice. As a result of all SEM 300 courses … You will learn the difference between doing charity and working for justice through systemic change. You will show that you understand this difference by producing projects and participating in advocacy work that has long-term goals. You will demonstrate a sustained commitment to the practice of social justice through community-driven projects designed…

Human Oppression: The African American and Puerto Rican Perspective

This course will examine economic, political, social and cultural forces operating at global, national and local levels, which generate and maintain oppression based on race and ethnicity in the United States. The course will focus on the oppression of the Black and Latino populations in the United States, highlighting the African American and Puerto Rican Experiences and perspectives. It will provide a framework for analyzing and understanding oppression. An historical perspective will be utilized to explore past and current oppression related to race and color, culture and ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual/emotional orientation and religion. Intercultural, intracultural, psychosocial, social and…

Poverty and Homelessness in America

Course Description This two quarter course will combine formal academic study on the topic of poverty and homelessness in the United States with an internship experience in a shelter-providing agency either in Santa Clara County or San Mateo County. Students will read weekly selections of articles and books relating to analyses of and personal experiences with poverty and homelessness in American cities. Perhaps the most important part of the course is the internship each student will be involved in at a local homeless shelter. Students will engage in a directed social service-type internship and will be expected to devote about…

Critical Issues in Human Development and Family

HDITS 4533: Critical Issues in Human Development and Family Science Instructor: Linda C. Robinson, Ph.D. Phone: 405-744-8356 Fax: 405-744-2800 E mail: frcdlcr {at} okstate(.)edu Office hours: MW 9:00-10:30 or by appointment Course Description An examination of the place of family relations and child development in the context of broader themes. An exploration of the students’ specialization and its implications for an educated life. Course Objectives To address a social need through the integration and application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes attained in the study of human development and family science. To appreciate the need for external funding in social service agencies. To…

Social Work with Burn-injured Children: A Service-Learning Experience

  Social Work with Burn-injured Children: A Service Learning Experience Course Overview: This course is designed to provide students with an intensive leaming experience working with an organization that serves children of families from diverse socio economic, racial and cultural backgrounds who have been bum injured within an unique organizational and community framework. Students will actively participate in a strengths-based, non-traditional setting to provide services that support the well-being of these children along with a diverse community of allied helping professionals outside of the field of social work. Students will learn about the process of bum recovery, gain understanding of…

Introduction to Community Leadership

Introduction to Community Leadership Teaching team: Dr. Michael Williams, Professor in the College, Holmdene 314, x4495 Rev. George Heartwell, Director, Aquinas College Community Leadership Institute, x3506 Course Description: As the introductory course for the Community Leadership major, the course will involve students in field experiences in community agencies and help them reflect on the meanings of community, service, and leadership as they work in those agencies. The goal of the course is to bring students to a deeper understanding of their role as servant leaders in the communities they not only find themselves living and working in but also those…

Homelessness in America: An Exploration of Poverty, Human Services and Social Change

HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA: AN EXPLORATION OF POVERTY, HUMAN SERVICES, AND SOCIAL CHANGE Mary Lou Finley, Ph.D., instructor Wednesday evenings, 7-9:30 p.m. Antioch University Seattle Credits: 4 (3 or 5 by arrangement) COURSE INTENTION It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for seeking to understand the root causes of the expansion of homelessness in the U.S. during the last 20 years, to convey a sense of the experience of homelessness and its consequences, and to explore efforts to meet the immediate needs of the homeless as well as advocate for long term change which can prevent homelessness….

Mediation and Conflict Resolution

Mediation & Conflict Resolution (Community Building, Peace, Conflict & Alternative Dispute Resolution) Robert N. Hansen, Ph.D. #5 Westminster Hall Home Phone: 573-491-3344 Cell: 573-645-3344 Office: x5362 or 5361 Email: hansenr {at} oaynet.wcmo(.)edu Fax: 573 592 5180 Office Hours: Monday/Wednesday 11:00 12:00 Noon Course Description & Objectives: This course provides an introduction into the concepts, theory and practice of community building, peacemaking, and conflict resolution. Topics will include: a) community development theory; b) conflict theory; c) peacemaking; d) principles of five types of ADR strategies (negotiation, arbitration, adjudication, conciliation, and mediation); d) the application of these concepts, theories and strategies to historical and…

Principles and Methods in Human Services

Ext. 6459 Alamance 213 D kiserp {at} elon(.)edu Office Hours: MWF 11:00-1:00, TT 1:00-2:30 In addition to the above hours I am generally in my office from about 8:00 until at least 3:00each weekday. While I make a special effort to guard the above office hours from the intrusionof other activities, I have found this to be impossible due to various meetings and administrativeresponsibilities. I encourage you to drop by any time but also feel free to schedule anappointment with me to be sure that you will find me in. Texts: Kozol, J. (2000). Ordinary Resurrections. New York, NY: Crown Publishers. Neukrug,…