Content with Disciplines : Sociology

In the News Discussion Guides: February 2017

The Institute for Democracy & Higher Education at Tufts University is offering a series of resources that will act as framings for a few issues that developed over the past several weeks, including possible readings, sources, and discussion questions. Think of these as starting points for purposeful, educational classroom and co-curricular discussions. Read more about the importance of these conversations in our blog post on the power of these teachable moments Read More from the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education at Tufts University More on the In the News Discussion Guide Series from IDHE

Realizing Place-Based Strategies (Institute 1 – Princeton)

Steve Dubb, Senior Fellow at the Democracy Collaborative shared this presentation on place-based strategy at the Civic Action Planning Institute in Princeton, NJ.

History Course on Race Inequality in DC

Washington, DC is “a city where the American dream and the American nightmare, pass each other daily, on the street and do not speak,” wrote an anonymous American some time back. Today she could be speaking about the plight of many in the nation’s capital: African Americans, Latin Americans, the homeless, many of them veterans, and others who had not benefited from the American Dream, in this city. In fact, DC is only capital city in the world where voters do not select their own voting representative to the national Congress. In this course, we will explore the “other Washington”…

Sociology SL Course: US Poverty, Welfare & Social Justice

Student Course Learning Goals: Students will be able to define poverty and identify the underlying causes and consequences of poverty in the US. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the impact of poverty on people’s lives, particularly in the Cleveland area. Students will learn to critically evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of social welfare policies & programs. Students will be able to discuss various strategies for reducing poverty, including the programs at Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry (LMM) Students will work together in research teams and learn how to conduct a program evaluation for LMM Connection to the Department Student Learning…

The Latino Community of the D.C. Metropolitan Area

Instructor: Marcy Fink Campos, Ed. S.                                                American Universitymfcampos@american.edu              The Latino Community of the D.C. Metropolitan Area     Spring 2014      American Studies 340.001CB   Course Overview and MethodologyThis course explores the Latino community of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, its history and origins, as well as current challenges and contributions. The DC/MD/VA (DMV) region is estimated to house about 805,000 Latinos, and over 250,000 are of Salvadoran origin. According to the 2010 census, 9.1 % of Washington, D.C.’s…

Human Behavior and the Social Environment

Course Description: The course will examine individual, group, organizational and societal theories of human development and their relevancy for social work practice. Students will use the theoretical paradigms presented to examine individual and social issues arising in social work practice. Fifteen hours of field work are required as a context for applying class room learning and preparing a case study for class presentation.   Required Texts: Zastrow, C.H., & Kirst-Ashman, K.K. (latest edition). Understanding human behavior and the social environment. Belmont, CA: Brookes/Cole. NASW Code of Ethics, most recent edition. Other assigned readings will be provided from: Fine, M., Weiss,…

Honors Women and Crime

Course Description: This course aims to explore the discourses, representations, and responses to female deviance and criminality in the Criminal Justice System, and how they may serve as a reflection of the views of wider society. Particular attention will be focussed on portrayals of women who commit non-traditional offenses, and their implications in the study of gender and crime. An examination and analysis of the explanations and discourses used to deal with the violent female offender will be used to construct informed insights about the status of women in the Criminal Justice System, and in society in general. Purposes and…

Black Literatures

Course Description This course explores literature from the African diaspora – particularly West Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. A range of questions will guide our discussion including: What constitutes the African diaspora? What is the relationship between diaspora and nation? What are the connections between the African diasporas in the construction of a black identity? We will read fiction and drama from Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Senegal, South Africa, Jamaica, Haiti, England, and the U.S. (among other countries) with protagonists who often look to Africa and/or the ancestors for renewal and empowerment. Among the themes we will explore are oral…

Urban Life and Culture

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND PURPOSE This applied anthropology course is a cross-cultural study of urbanization, urbanism, and human problems associated with metropolitan environments. Major emphasis is given to the ethnography of city life and its relationship to the practical applications of urban research, especially in the contexts of globalization and neoliberalism. Selected readings from recent, book-length urban ethnographies written by anthropologists will be used as models for presenting coherent and readable syntheses of theory, methods, and analysis of various urban issues and experiences of urban life. Documentary videos carefully selected to illustrate the diversity of urban life and culture will also…

Philanthropy

Southwestern College SOCS255—Philanthropy Facilitator: Joni Rankin Course Overview: An exploration of philanthropy and the philanthropic process, nonprofits and their boards, grant writing and fundraising, strategic grant-making, and sustainable philanthropic impact as informed by the Students4Giving program and the corresponding SC grant. Course Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, students will Understand local community-based knowledge and collaborate with existing non-profit boards and community members Manage the philanthropic process from mission statement to measurement, including RFPs and the impact of grant-making choices Explore a sustainable campus infrastructure that focuses on the non-profit sector and needed resources, including the development of a board…

Violence in Families

Course Description: This course explores various forms of violence in families including violence between spouses and violence of parents toward children. Factors contributing to the violence will be discussed as well as methods of preventing and/or ameliorating patterns of violence within families. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the reciprocal relationship between the family and society by exploring violence in families as a training ground for societal violence as well as how family patterns are influenced by the values and attitudes in larger society. (This course counts toward the CJS, NVS, & WGS minors.) Course Goals: The…

Immigrant Communities in Colorado

Course Description: The current era of globalization has generated the apparent contradiction between the free flow of capital across borders and restrictive immigration policy. In order to gain a greater understanding of these trends, this course will examine changing patterns of Latino immigration in the US-Mexican border region and in Colorado Springs. The course will consider a range of issues including: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the multifaceted nature of integration between US and Mexican economies, economic development in Mexico that has generated emigration to the US, the nature of the Mexican migrant journey to the US,…

Connecting Families, Past and Present

Goals: This course will explore “the family” in relation to cultural identities and political policies in the United States and around the world, combined with a unique opportunity to reach out to and interact with diverse families nearby. With topics including the “Holy Family” to “Father Knows Best,” from Freud’s “Oedipal Complex” to current debates on “Family Values,” from children with AIDS to international adoption, students will analyze changing family socio-economic and psychological structures and the evolving representations of motherhood, fatherhood and childhood in the past and particularly in the present. We will compare public and private efforts to aid…

Citizenship, Service, and Social Change: Theory and Application

Objectives: The guiding question in this course is: how do we develop citizens of a democracy who have the capacity and interest to engage in the kinds of community work needed to create and maintain healthy communities? Unpacking this question requires examining, problematizing, imagining and linking theories about: civic education, community development, complex organizations, politics, social change and democracy. In this course, we will juxtapose theory and practice. Each student will work with others to take on a project that broadly engages students in public work. The project can be on-campus through some sort of student organization, or it can be…

Social Foundation of Education

Course Overview The social foundations of education course is an exploration and analysis of the underlying issues within contemporary educational policies, practices, and theories. It is an attempt to ground the day-to-day realities of the classroom within a larger philosophical, historical, anthropological, political, and sociological context. Such an interdisciplinary perspective will allow students to begin to reflect upon the structures and practices of American education and provide a foundation from which to continue becoming reflective and critical educational practitioners and leaders. It is also an opportunity to investigate the role of schooling and education within a democracy. Through classic and…

Crime and Justice in America: The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program

Mission The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is an opportunity for a small group of students from Cabrini College and residents of the Montgomery County Correctional Facility to come together as a class to study the American criminal justice system. We will share common readings and discuss our ideas and perceptions about issues of crime and justice, the criminal justice system, corrections and imprisonment. Through dialogue we will bring together our theoretical knowledge and our lived, practical experience to gain a deeper understanding of the criminal justice system. Objectives To create an environment that will facilitate the honest exchange of ideas…

Community and Culture

EWS 475                                    Community and Culture                          Winter, 2005 Class Location:   Bldg. 66, Room 247 Instructor:   Jose Calderon,     E-mail:   jzcalderon@csupomona.edu Office Hours:   2-4 on MW and 1-3 on Tuesday’s in   Bldg. 5, Room 119   Description of Course This course examines how multi-racial communities have become mosaics of competing land interests and demographic transformations.   This will be achieved through the reading of various articles that combine community and multicultural issues with issues of global, local, and regional development and restructuring; through the study of examples of building community (particularly in Los Angeles county);…

Multicultural Issues in Urban Affairs

  URBAN SEMESTER PROGRAM Multicultural Issues in Urban Affairs HE470 Seminars are normally embedded in the site visits. 3 credits This course uses New York City as a classroom. The landscape, built environment, and people in it are our texts. A great teacher, Paolo Freire, once said that we need to learn how to “read the word and the world.” This is what we will do in this course with an emphasis on reading the world. Two parts direct our attention. The first part focuses us on the formation and development of this multicultural city. We will traverse lower Manhattan…

Community Involvement

Professors Jim Ostrow, Behavioral Sciences Department Maureen Goldman, English Department Readings Packet under course name sold in bookstore: Jonathan Kozol, Amazing Grace (New York: Crown, 1995) David Bollier, Aiming Higher (Washington, D.C.: American Management Association, 1996) Additional readings TBA In this course, students engage in public service within agencies or organizations in the Greater Boston area. In their written work and class discussions, they will reflect on both the purposes of that work as well as on its limits as a response to specific needs within the community and more general problems of social justice. Students will also explore issues…

Streetwise Sociology

  SO103 Streetwise Sociology Don Stannard Friel Ralston Hall 303 x3770 don@ndnu.edu Office Hours Tu.: 3:30-5:30, Wed.: 1-2, 5-6. The Course Streetwise Sociology is a course designed to familiarize the student with the inner city culture by studying it, learning sociological understandings of why it exists, and, perhaps most importantly, by becoming a part of it. We do this by taking on projects that benefit the community, and in so doing meet, interact with, and learn from individuals who live and work there. Our specific activities will involve Halloween in the Tenderloin, The Youth College Project, and Miracle on 6th…