Content with Disciplines : Philosophy

Psychology Integration SL Year-long Course

This Capstone Seminar in the fall is part of a 2-course sequence. The overarching theme for both courses is “Culmination and Integration— A Year in Living the Mission of LMU.” The Capstone Seminar in Fall 2015, drawing on the Bio-Psycho-Socio/Cultural model and the gifts of discernment and Ignatian Spirituality lay the theoretical foundation for a more practical aspect of the year-long objectives in Spring 2016. The seminar in the fall (Part I) is designed to enliven the first 2 pillars of the LMU Mission, the Encouragement of Learning (in all its forms) and the Education of the Whole Person. The…

Animal Cognition & Consciousness

PHIL/COGS/BIOL 314 PHIL 414 Animal Cognition & Consciousness with laboratory component Required Readings: Rader & Radner, Animal Consciousness Dennett, Kinds of Minds Allen & Bekoff, Species of Mind Bekoff, The Cognitive Animal Altmann 1974 Observational study of behavior Many articles and excerpts posted on the Blackboard site. Be sure you can access Blackboard! Course Description: This course examines the notions of intelligence, cognition, reasoning, consciousness, and mental content as they appear in the philosophical views and empirical studies of animals in individual and social contexts. Cognitive ethology strives to scientifically measure the extent and limits of the mental lives of animals. We will…

Contemporary Moral Issues

Phil 203A: Contemporary Moral Issues, Course with Service Learning Dr. Monica Cowart monica.cowart@merrimack.edu Fall 2002 “The real point of ethics is to offer tools for thinking about difficult matters, recognizing from the start as the very rationale for ethics, in fact that the world is seldom so simple or clear cut. Struggle and uncertainty are part of ethics, as they are part of life.” – Anthony Weston Course Objectives: (1) To introduce students to some influential theories and classics in the field, (2) To teach students how to critically evaluate philosophical arguments, and (3) To help students explore the connections…

Philosophy of Education

Molloy College PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION Course: PHI 203: Philosophy of Education Session: Fall 2000 Instructor: Dr. Michael S. Russo Course Hours: Mon, 3:26 6:15 Location: Philosophy Department Seminar Room Office: 1079 Hempstead Ave. Mon/Wed: 12:15 3:15pm Tues/Thurs: 3 5:30pm I. Course Objectives Since the time of Plato philosophers have been concerned with the best way to educate young men and women. Indeed, some of the greatest thinkers in the history of Western thought have developed provocative theories about the goals of education and the means to attain these goals within the classroom. The aim of this course is to examine…

The School and Society

Philosophy 105: The School and Society Contact Information Lisa Heldke Old Main 106A x7029 heldke@gac.edu Office Hours M 3:30-4:30, T 9:00-10:00, W 2:30-3:30, and By appointment (I encourage you to come talk to me at any point, about the issues the class is discussing, or for consultation on papers or help with understanding a reading assignment. Feel free to schedule an appointment if none of these times works for you.) Course Texts John Dewey, Democracy and Education W.E.B. DuBois, The Education of Black People DuBois, “The Talented Tenth” (on the web at http://douglass.speech.nwu.edu/dubois.htm) Paolo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed Deschooling…

Liberation Theology

Institution: DePaul University Discipline: Religious Studies / Political Science / Philosophy Title: Liberation Theology Instructor: Charles R. Strain LIBERATION THEOLOGY PROLOGUE Violence “You gringos, ” a Salvadoran peasant told an American visitor, “are always worried about violence done with machine guns and machetes. But there is another kind of violence that you should be aware of, too. I used to work on a hacienda. Myjob was to take care of the dueho’s dogs. I gave them meat and bowls of milk, food that I couldn’t give my own family. When the dogs were sick I took them to the veterinarian. When my children were…

Individual & Community

Individual & Community Seminar IC 101.07 honors Professor Joni Doherty Phone: X1025 (Home: 924 0206, please do not call after 9 p.m. unless it is an emergency!) Email: doherq@fpc.edu Office: Edgewood 005B Office hours: Mondays, 1:30 to 2:30 pm; Tuesdays, 10:00 to 12:00 noon; or by appointment Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:40 to 2:55 Location: CR205 Peer Advisor: Melissa Taylor Phone: 2961 Email: taylorm@fpc.edu Course Description The questions raised by the relationship between the individual and the community form the connective theme of the general education program at Franklin Pierce College. As the first step in the sequence of our…

PHILOSOPHY 206

I. Course Description This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to think critically about contemporary ethical issues, both personal and social, and to develop a normative value system as a basis for distinguishing the good and bad in human conduct. II.          Course Objectives 1)       To expand the student’s understanding of the methods and concepts of philosophy, especially as they address the issues of right conduct in personal and social life. 2)        To introduce the student to the great writers of philosophy, especially St. Thomas Aquinas, in the West as they address issues in ethics. 3)       To…

Philosophical Perspectives: Asian Thought

TEXTS: Easwaran (trans.) Bhagavad Gita Leder Spiritual Passages Glassman and Fields Instructions to the Cook Lao Tsu Tao te Ching (miscellaneous handouts) TENTATIVE SCHEDULE J18 Intro. to Course J20 BG 1- 12 (Brahman and Atman) J25 BG 12-14TM, 47-65M (Maya) J27 BG 14-16M, SP 17-31 (Dharma) Fl BG 16-21, 65-69 (Karma) -Life’s Perfect Lessons F3 SP 197-206 (Reincarnation) F8 BG 30-39, 71-90 (Karma Yoga) F10 BG 99-109, 129-36; (Raja and Bhakti Yoga) – Plugging In F15 BG 39-42, Gandhi (Ahimsa and Satyagraha) F17 The Soul Knows No Bars (talk, evening of 16th) F22 TEST #1 F24 SP 3-16, 187-96, 206-10…

Introduction to Philosophy – Asian Traditions

INTRODUCTION In search of answers to fundamental questions about life, if we turn to Asia, we would need to ask. “What are Asian ways of thinking? What are Asian sources of wisdom?” Some people look at Asia and see countries, others see cultures. In this course, we see Asia as moving philosophical tectonic plates upon which ride the histories and cultures of its countries. What forms and moves these philosophical developments in Asia? As we seek answers to such questions as these, we may discover options to our own initial answers to questions about self, world, and values that drive…

Introduction To Philosophy

INTRODUCTION “Know thyself,” the two thousand year old dictum of the Oracle of Delphi still challenges us today to examine and evaluate the beliefs, values, and thinking that guide what we do and define who we are. Rather than a purely introspective and solitary project, however, an examination of one’s belief system is perhaps best conducted in the company of ideas of classical philosophers who have similarly taken up the challenge. In this course, we take advantage of this and another consortium, the philosophical community of inquiry that we develop as a class. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is designed to…

Personal and Social Responsibility

This is a two-semester, 12 credit course fulfilling all core requirements in philosophy and theology. Its contents include your activities in field projects as well as readings, classroom discussions, and conferences with the instructor. You may select your field involvement from the range of field projects sponsored by the Pulse Program. (Contact the Pulse Office, McElroy 117.) The classroom and field project are intended to complement each other in leading students to reflect upon the meaning of their lives and the society they live in. In your field projects, you will undoubtedly encounter places, people and situations which will cause…

Education and Social Change

The practicum will be in one of the learning circles at Neighborhood House, on Monday or Wednesday, 6-9 PM, or Tuesday, 7-9 PM. An email “listserv” will be established for this class. Liberal Education Theme Requirements. This course counts toward two liberal education theme requirements: Cultural Diversity and Citizenship and Public Ethics. Course goals and means This course falls in the area of philosophy of education, but it also draws heavily on ideas from political philosophy, the philosophy of language and the theory of knowledge. It focuses on a family of approaches to education which has shown promise in moving…

Women in Philosophical Thought

This course is about the various ways society has thought about and portrayed women, and the impact these views have had on women's roles in society. The goal, however, is not merely passive acquisition of knowledge, but the development of authentic and well-informed responses to these philosophical views of women. Discussions will be loosely organized around three themes: ideas about and images of women's bodies, theories regarding women's rational abilities and the ways women gain knowledge, and opinions concerning women's ethical capacities. To help make the course content more meaningful, there will be an experiential component to the course–the opportunity…

Philosophical and Cultural Foundations of Inclusive Education

Course Description: EDUC 163/263 is an introduction to the philosophical, historical, cultural, and legal foundations of education within the context of a democratic, multicultural society. Within the area of philosophical foundations, students learn about curricular aims proposed by various philosophical traditions. There is an emphasis on progressive formulations that support the inclusion of students of all abilities and backgrounds within an inclusive milieu. In historical foundations students learn about the immigrant experience in the United States, the movement from segregated to integrated schools, and the history of special education, including society’s response to disability at different periods. In cultural foundations…

“On Death & Dying”

Freshman Seminar – Integrative Studies Course Description Since the publication of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’ book, On Death & Dying, there has been an explosion of interest in the subject of death and of death education. Such interest is quite healthy because dealing with death and dying allows us to grow and know more about ourselves as human beings. When we have been honest with ourselves as finite beings and have confronted the human reality of death, we may learn to live and help others to live fuller and more meaningful lives. The study of death and dying permits us to learn…