Content with Disciplines : History

History Course on Race Inequality in DC

Washington, DC is “a city where the American dream and the American nightmare, pass each other daily, on the street and do not speak,” wrote an anonymous American some time back. Today she could be speaking about the plight of many in the nation’s capital: African Americans, Latin Americans, the homeless, many of them veterans, and others who had not benefited from the American Dream, in this city. In fact, DC is only capital city in the world where voters do not select their own voting representative to the national Congress. In this course, we will explore the “other Washington”…

Sociology SL Course: US Poverty, Welfare & Social Justice

Student Course Learning Goals: Students will be able to define poverty and identify the underlying causes and consequences of poverty in the US. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the impact of poverty on people’s lives, particularly in the Cleveland area. Students will learn to critically evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of social welfare policies & programs. Students will be able to discuss various strategies for reducing poverty, including the programs at Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry (LMM) Students will work together in research teams and learn how to conduct a program evaluation for LMM Connection to the Department Student Learning…

Women and Social Change in Modern Africa

Course Description: This course examines the lives of women in various parts of the African continent, taking into account social, economic, and political change.  Looking into women’s private as well as their public lives, the course considers gender relations and family, issues of power, and resistance.  Readings include women’s own life histories and novels, as well as the work of academic historians. Course Objectives: To understand the great diversity in African women’s lives across time and space To understand gender roles and relations within the public and private spheres To understand the impact of social, economic, and political change on…

Connecting Families, Past and Present

Goals: This course will explore “the family” in relation to cultural identities and political policies in the United States and around the world, combined with a unique opportunity to reach out to and interact with diverse families nearby. With topics including the “Holy Family” to “Father Knows Best,” from Freud’s “Oedipal Complex” to current debates on “Family Values,” from children with AIDS to international adoption, students will analyze changing family socio-economic and psychological structures and the evolving representations of motherhood, fatherhood and childhood in the past and particularly in the present. We will compare public and private efforts to aid…

Colonial America

HIST 367 ? Colonial America A Designated Civic Learning/Mentoring Course Course Description and Objectives: Hist 367 is an undergraduate, upper level history course that examines the evolution of American colonies from initial European exploration to mature provincial societies. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans (and their descendants), and on the development of distinctive regions. This course will enhance your historical knowledge, teach you to locate and analyze primary materials, dissect secondary sources, evaluate complex issues, express yourself clearly and convincingly, and present your research in a scholarly fashion. Students enrolled in Hist 367 have…

Women, Race & Class

Women, Race & Class is an interdisciplinary examination of the historical institutions, forces and movements that have shaped the status, identities and conditions of multicultural women. While many of the assigned readings are based in the United States, we will also look at global connections and contexts. We will emphasize relationships between theory, practice/action and multiple perspectives.

Consequences of War

This course is about these, the consequences of war and, in particular, the consequences of World War 11, Korea, Vietnam and the Gulf for America today. In any number of political science and history courses at Rutgers, you can learn about the causes of these specific wars or of war in general.

Human Oppression: The African American and Puerto Rican Perspective

This course will examine economic, political, social and cultural forces operating at global, national and local levels, which generate and maintain oppression based on race and ethnicity in the United States. The course will focus on the oppression of the Black and Latino populations in the United States, highlighting the African American and Puerto Rican Experiences and perspectives. It will provide a framework for analyzing and understanding oppression. An historical perspective will be utilized to explore past and current oppression related to race and color, culture and ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual/emotional orientation and religion. Intercultural, intracultural, psychosocial, social and…

Multicultural Issues in Urban Affairs

  URBAN SEMESTER PROGRAM Multicultural Issues in Urban Affairs HE470 Seminars are normally embedded in the site visits. 3 credits This course uses New York City as a classroom. The landscape, built environment, and people in it are our texts. A great teacher, Paolo Freire, once said that we need to learn how to “read the word and the world.” This is what we will do in this course with an emphasis on reading the world. Two parts direct our attention. The first part focuses us on the formation and development of this multicultural city. We will traverse lower Manhattan…

Poverty and Homelessness in America

Course Description This two quarter course will combine formal academic study on the topic of poverty and homelessness in the United States with an internship experience in a shelter-providing agency either in Santa Clara County or San Mateo County. Students will read weekly selections of articles and books relating to analyses of and personal experiences with poverty and homelessness in American cities. Perhaps the most important part of the course is the internship each student will be involved in at a local homeless shelter. Students will engage in a directed social service-type internship and will be expected to devote about…

A Nation of Joiners: Voluntarism and Social Movements in America

This course explores the history of voluntary activity as a means to social change. In addition to the assigned readings and regular class meetings, most students pursue concurrent service-learning placements in non-profit groups for 3-5 hours each week.

US History Since 1865

History since 1865 begins with the promises of Reconstruction and continues through the struggles of the 20th century, largely defined by Cold War politics and militarism. We explore the meaning of freedom and American identity in the context of capitalist development and the U.S. as a global power. How did institutions such as the government or schools reflect these changes? What impact did unions or other grassroots organizations have on redefining values and priorities? What issues do we face in the 21st century? Particular emphasis will be placed on the experiences of working people, women and people of color.

Seminar in American Architecture: Landscape, History, and Public Culture

Tuesdays 7-10 PM Class: 2227 AA Email: scobey@umich.edu Office: 3126 AA OVERVIEW: How is history represented or effaced in the built and natural environment? What role do historical narrative and historical awareness play in public culture, so that stories about the past become expressions of present-day values and conflicts? How does social memory inform processes of city-building, and how might it inform landscape design? This seminar explores the links among place-making, historical consciousness, and public culture. It will explore such topics as cultural landscape studies, the relation of place to community identity, the role of historical narrative in public discourse,…

The Portland YWCA in the World War Two Era

Introduction This course is one in an on-going series of capstones designed to research and write the Portland YWCA’s history in anticipation of its centennial celebration in 2001. Our focus will be on the 1940s. Themes include: war work and patriotism; working women’s politics and organizing; black migration and civil rights; feminism and women’s social activism; Japanese internment and relocation; youth and teen culture. After background reading and discussion, students will shape a research agenda and carry out research in the YWCA archives and in other repositories in Portland. The course will culminate in a public presentation on our findings…

Immigration and Ethnicity in America: the Urban Crucible

Spring 1999History 232/American Studies 244 Office Hours: Tues./ Thurs. 2:40-4 Our immigrant society has been described as a melting pot, a mosaic, a salad bowl, as well as other less attractive metaphors. Through lectures, class discussions, readings, outside speakers and panels, films, and a community learning project, this course looks at various topics in immigration history, and explores how ethnicity and the city both played a role in the experiences of the immigrants and in the minds of those citizens who received them. The questions raised by this course have confused and divided scholars, politicians, journalists, and citizens. I don't…